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Mega Man Classic Series

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Intro
Characters

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Mega Man
Mega Man 2

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Mega Man 3
Mega Man 4

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Mega Man 5
Mega Man 6

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Mega Man 7
Mega Man 8
Mega Man & Bass

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Mega Man 9
Mega Man 10

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Mega Man (Game Boy)
Mega Man II
Mega Man III

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Mega Man IV
Mega Man V

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The Power Battle
The Power Fighters

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The Wily Wars
Mega Man (Game Gear)
Complete Works

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Battle & Fighters
Anniversary Collection
Powered Up

Page 12:
Wily & Right no RockBoard
Mega Man Soccer

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Battle & Chase
Super Adventure Rockman

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Tiger LCDs
IBM PC Games
Rockman & Forte Wonderswan

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Rockman's IQ Challenge
Rockman Gold Empire
Rockman Strategy

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Mobile Games
Panic Shot! Rockman
Street Fighter x Mega Man

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Unreleased Games
The Krion Conquest

Page 18:
Cameos
Other Media
Legacy

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Mega Man 5 / Rockman 5: Blues no Wana?! (ロックマン5: ブルースの罠?!) - NES, PlayStation, PlayStation 2, GameCube, Xbox, Mobile, Wii Virtual Console, Wii U Virtual Console, 3DS Virtual Console, PSN (1992)

American NES Cover

Japanese Famicom Cover

European NES Cover

Dr. Light has been kidnapped! The only thing found at the scene of the crime was an orange scarf. Has Proto Man turned to the dark side for good...? You bet it's someone else behind this!

The fifth installment on the old NES arrived with no surprises. If anything, the big question at the time of its release was why it was on the old 8-bit Nintendo when the SNES had landed in all regions of the world. Even if someone actually would buy into Proto Man being a bad guy in the game (as Ruby-Spears obviously did for the American cartoon), the game itself follows the exact structure set by the last in the series, complete with 2 fortresses to wade through after the real culprit reveals himself. Three guesses on who it is?

Capcom decided to focus more on tweaks and pruning under the hood. Gone is Rush Marine, practically for good for the rest of the franchise, though a generic jet ski is used for an auto scrolling section of one water stage. The New Mega Buster from Mega Man 4 was plot-wise upgraded to a Super Mega Buster thanks to Dr. Cossack, a modification to address concerns with its overpowered nature. Mega Man no longer flashes green when charging, but instead he flickers black and blue before delivering a newly drawn shot that's a little wider vertically and shorter horizontally. The fully charged shot comes with 2 caveats: its power causes a recoil kickback that, while small, could potentially push Mega Man off a thin ledge. Furthermore, the charge now resets if the Blue Bomber takes damage, adding risk in order to weigh into the limitless powered blasts for better balance with the garnered boss weapons. At least that was the plan.

Proto Man's bad bot posse keeps about the same ratio of great and terrible designs picked from the best or most unique of the contest's lot, but damn if they don't shack up in some of the best lairs the series has had.

Robot Masters

DWN-033 Gravity Man

Down becomes up whenever this Robot Master so chooses. His arm cannon is rather weak, but he can aim it at will. His true strength lies in his Gravity Hold, able to fling everything upside-down and up to the stratosphere. He always stays on the vertical side opposite of Mega Man. [Weakness: Star Crash]

DWN-034 Wave Man

A rather uniquely designed, aquatic themed Robot Master burdened with a terribly repetitive attack pattern. Make a Water Wave plume from the floor, fire a harpoon, then jump. Repeat until blown up by Blue Bomber. You have to wonder if the winners of the design contests feel cheapened if his or her creation turns out to be so lame in the final product. [Weakness: Charge Kick]

DWN-035 Stone Man

Hey, a neat looking Guts Man analogue! He loves to leap up and crumble on top of Mega Man only to rebuild himself brick by brick. He's quite resilient that way. If needed, he sends out spiraling Power Stones that hardly hit anything. Luckily, his arsenal of moves becomes more impressive in The Power Fighters. [Weakness: Napalm Bomb]

DWN-020 Gyro Man

A neat copter-bot that feels right at home in the clouds. Once he revs up and takes to the skies, he hides away in the dense cumulus to rain his shots down on Mega Man before landing again. His razor-sharp Gyro Attack propeller blades are able to change their trajectories mid-flight, making it one of the best special weapons in this game. [Weakness: Gravity Hold]

DWN-037 Star Man

A robot with dreams and ambition. A robot who adores the opera as he dances amongst the distant galaxies. A robot who's cursed with having the worst shield weapon in the series: the Star Crash. His design is kinda stupid, too. [Weakness: Water Wave]

DWN-038 Charge Man

Yep, a steam-powered locomotive-based Robot Master. It's like one of those more out-there Power Rangers monster-of-the-week designs they throw in mid-season. Outside of raining hot coal from his chimney pipe, he choo-choos his metal frame to railroad you since he's incapable of leaping off the ground. Somehow this attack becomes a Charge Kick weapon to Mega Man that he can only use while sliding. [Weakness: Power Stone]

DWN-039 Napalm Man

A mobile assortment of explosives with the mind of a gun nut. What's not to love? He has no arms, merely launchers for his Napalm Bombs. And that's not counting the other missiles he carries around. Fittingly, his stage takes place in a jungle with his lair square in the heart of darkness. [Weakness: Crystal Eye]

DWN-023 Crystal Man

The second Robot Master designed by Yusuke Murata. Not much to say about his appearance outside of his crystal ball motif. He sells his phony orbs for profit to help fund Wily's dastardly plans. It's a little difficult to dodge his Crystal Eye orbs as they shatter and ricochet off the walls, but not as tough as his sparkly mine stage preceding the battle. [Weakness: Gyro Attack]

Dark Man

Did anyone really think it was Proto Man all along? Nope, just a tetra of bots built by Wily that fooled the good doctor and his gullible blue robo-boy. They serve as the bosses for Proto Man's Castle and have many colored and variants: Green Tank Treaded DM 1, Grey Electro Barrier DM 2, the super-cheap Purple Freeze Sniper DM 3, and the Spiked Red Combination Leader DM 4. They're pretty alright baddies but not as threatening as many of the screen-filling bosses the Fortresses are known for. Wily saved those for later.

Two faults with the enemy designs hinder the game in different respects. The first is the influx of multiple air or aerial bots, most of them having the AI complexity of a DOOM zombie: beeline toward the player. Granted, each of these foes do so in a manner unique enough to distinct them on that act alone, but the added annoyance of so many divebombing metallic kamikazes seems less a fun challenge and more an excuse to break out the Gravity Hold. Second flaw: a more aesthetic setback, but many of the enemies lack a charming animalistic or humanoid look - or the trademark googly eyes, in some cases. Many of the robot forces look like, well, robots: lifeless gun turrets, flying drones, dull factory machines and missiles. Granted, there are still robotic dolphins, radio-controlled mice, and hens pumping out marching eggs, and the standard Joes and Mets arrive in new forms, but the stacks of bland uninteresting non-fauna to shoot do take some of the possible fun out.

The special weapons take a dramatic drop in quality. Various factors like glitching or unbalanced energy consumption or just plain lack of enemies with a weaknes to any of them makes sticking to the stock buster a wiser choice. The Water Wave works as a faster Bubble Lead but tends to not propel itself if you stand near a ledge. Star Crash shields disperse after one single contact, even from a stray enemy bullet, yet doesn't destroy many threats with one hit in return. The Crystal Eye would be better suited with an eight-directional attack method and/or more baddies that are actually weak to it - plus you have to wait for all the scattering balls to disappear before you can launch another volley. The Charge Kick only works during sliding, whether you want to use its energy or not, and doesn't prevent you from taking a hit most of the time. The worst offender is the Power Stone weapon that spins outward from Mega Man in a dazzlingly fast trajectory you cannot aim with barely anyone but Charge Man weak to it. The rest are generally situational to higher or lower enemies. For many players who tend to save their special weapons only for bosses, this isn't much of a problem, but it leaves the game feeling less special in comparison to its predecessors if the default gun is the best choice for the majority of the playthrough. Unless you unlock gamebreaker Beat, whose fast, baddie-seeking pecks of death trump almost everything in your arsenal. This mechanical bird of prey homes in on any threat that Mega Man might have trouble reaching, which equals anything not right in front of it. And since bosses aren't immune, Beat can swoop in and peck the baddie until its health is delepted or its energy runs out.

A small addition to Mega Man 5 that became a staple later on was the Mega Tank. Within a handful of stages, this E-Tank with an M on it not only refills Mega Man's life points, but all of the weapon energy as well. Mega Man can only carry one at a time, with a side-effect of making all other M-Tanks he runs into disappear when he already got one. The late Wily stages have M-Tanks at or near the beginning of each level, negating the issue that weapons don't refuel mid-fortress with a quick pick-me-up before replacing the spent tank with ease. Naturally, this exploit happens to occur in the game with one of the weakest weapon sets, but them's the breaks. Later Mega Man games would change the item's name to the Super Tank and would mostly be available only within the game's store for a high price, without having Wily keeping a half a dozen just floating around to make things easy for his blue menance.

There are a few other flaws brought about to the fifth installment, most likely at fault to the annual push. A few design quirks in the level structure lead to sloppy missteps with blank areas like placing a ladder on the far right side next to the next exit point, leading to a wasteful empty screen breaking up the flow. A few other areas force the Ble Bomber to back up in order to reset the scrolling, so he's placed in the center. The retooled Rush Coil with the spring on the bottom of the robo-pooch is touchy at best, sometimes leaving Rush sproinging into the air without Mega Man in tow and wasting time and energy. As always, the ending leaves Wily running off to scheme for another day, though it isn't quite as ridiculous as his sudden door departure in Mega Man 4, since Mega Man and Proto Man are busy saving Dr. Light from the fortress collapsing in on all of them.

Old vs new Rush Coil.

So why isn't Mega Man 5 completely hated?

The game's visuals and locales are arguably the most stunning of the series' NES lineup. Given that the inner workings and technical tricks and memory mapping has been overhauled again and again over the years, Capcom's crew was able to make the game vibrant with lesser repeating textures. The best examples might be the lush splendor of Napalm Man's jungle slowly leading to the secret ammo stockpile bunker deep within the ground, the stark orange and blue gritting mountain summits and mining caves of Stone Man's level, or the almost neon pink & purple Crystal Man's domain. Many gimmicks and designs ideals have been tossed in for means of keeping the levels from seeming quite so stale. Wave Man has a jetski section with a massive robo-octopus battle, Star Man's low gravity outer space physics, Charge Man's train level bumping up and down on the tracks, and Gravity Man's flipping gravitational switches that reverse the controller's up and down inputs. One late fortress stage even apes the snake block ride elements from Super Mario World. Mari Yamaguchi's score stays strong and energetic throughout, though it tends to stay within the same "font", as it were, while only changing the rhythm. Yoko Shimomura sneaks in by composing the music for the Dr. Wily stage music, which sadly only has one tune per fortress now.

Mega Man 5 continues the love it-or-hate it trend of the latter NES episodes, not rocking the boat too bad but still lacking the cohesion that 2 or 3 had. Still, it showed that Capcom was willing to test out new gameplay twists, almost as if tossing ideas in to see what sticks. While much of it didn't, what did make its way in the game worked before any gameplay spins and gimmicks went too far or broke the game entirely. Those would come later.

Quick Info:

Developer:

Publisher:

Designer:

  • Ichirou Mihara

Genre:

Themes:


Mega Man 5 (NES)

Mega Man 5 (NES)

Mega Man 5 (NES)

Mega Man 5 (NES)

Mega Man 5 (NES)

Mega Man 5 (NES)

Mega Man 5 (NES)

Mega Man 5 (NES)

Mega Man 5 (NES)

Mega Man 5 (NES)

Mega Man 5 (NES)

Mega Man 5 (NES)


Additional Screenshots


Mega Man 6 / Rockman 6: Shijou Saidai no Tatakai!! (ロックマン6: 史上最大の戦い!!) - NES, PlayStation, PlayStation 2, GameCube, Xbox, Mobile, Wii Virtual Console, Wii U Virtual Console, 3DS Virtual Console, PSN (1993)

American NES Cover

Japanese Famicom Cover

The 1st Annual Robot Tournament brings forth the best bots from around the globe to partake in challenging tests to decide who is the most powerful robot in the world. This entire contest is headed by a mysterious billionaire referred to as only Mr. X. If Enter the Dragon has taught us anything (besides "Don't mess with Bruce Lee") is that tbattle tourneys like this always conceal some shady motives behind them. Sure enough, before the last event, Mr. X steps out to the crowd proclaiming that he's having these 8 robots assist him in taking over the Earth as the final challenge. Bet you'll never guess who Mr. X is...

Mr. X

Leader of the X Foundation, which funds the World Robot Alliance. He claims he's the one who pulled Dr. Wily's strings in the past to do evil. He looks an awful lot like Dr. Wily, too. Remove the shades, the beard, and the cape, and he'd be a spitting image of the mad scientist we know and love. Could he be...? Nah...!

Fool us once, shame on you. Fool us twice, shame on us. Try to fool us 4 times in a row, you're seriously not bothering anymore, Capcom. Coming out nearly 3 years after the Super Nintendo had been released in each country, and mere months after Mega Man X came out for the 16bit system, the 6th classic installment landed on the old console with little fanfare from its publisher and most gamers. In fact, Capcom did not publish the title outside of Japan, leaving Nintendo to distribute the game in North America and leaving Europe skipping number 6 in the series up until 2013.

On the surface, there doesn't seem to be too much changed from the 5th outing, and for the most part, that is correct. Beat makes a return, though slighty nerfed by not attacking bosses but only needing to acquire 4 plates this time around. These 4 plates can be found by defeating the correct Robot Master at the end of the stage which reside in slightly harder to reach branched paths. This little shift encompass many of the other changes and revamps made in the game. For one, there are much more branching paths available for many stages, not just leading to the fake and real boss. Two, returning to these stages changes the color palette as an added signifier, generally changing the time of day, as well. Third, and most important, is the changes to Rush. Gone are the Coil and Jet forms in exchange to 2 adapters to transform Mega Man. The Rush Power Adapter boosts the Blue Bombers strength, able to break through shields, breakable blocks, and more with chargable close-range punches, along with sending certain enemies hurdling back. The Rush Jet Adaptor makes Mega Man propel himself in flight for as long as the meter holds out. Both adapters don't need weapon energy to function, but they prevent the player from being able to slide and also the ability to charge up buster shots in the case of the Jet form. Nevertheless, reaching the real Robot Masters to gain a Beat plate lies in using these power in one shape or form.

The adaptors themselves illustrate many of the problems with Mega Man 6 in general: namely that the game is a relative cakewalk. The Power Adaptor is earned after clearing Flame Man's stage, which isn't too difficult of a level to beat. After that, there's hardly an enemy that can withstand either a charged Mega Buster or Power Punch or two. That is if you bother fighting them at all. Most baddies' impact damage is low to Mega Man, so you can bum rush through many corridors without firing and come out barely scathed just in time to find a power up in one of the numerous breakable blocks along the way. The Robot Masters' fight patterns are very formulaic, many of them firing their trademark weapon then leaping high enough for you to easily walk under and charge your buster or punch during their long airtime. Speaking of airtime, the Jet Adaptor keeps you hovering off the ground for great lengths, able to bypass any spike pit, hole, or groups of enemies at will. A lot of levels lack tight corridors or low ceilings, leaving this power up very exploitable. With these adaptors and an E-Tank or two, Mega Man's practically unstoppable for most of the game. In fact, the only stage liable to give you cheap deaths at all outside of a few tricky to get to but optional branching paths is the straightforward pit-riddled Plant Man stage, which grants you the Jet Adaptor after completion. Ironically, the stage would've been super easy flying over the leaping robo-fishes with Rush. The only drawback to sitting to these overpowered forms is the rather tedious menu switch to them with a little animation to showcase their abilities, mashing the start or A button to try to cancel out of the demo as fast as possible.

As for the Robot Masters themselves, they're generally grouped in fan's terms into two sets of 4: four elemental-based and four warrior-based. The standard stage select boss preview shows off the stats of the Robot Master, his title, the area the level will take place, and even his form of power source (mostly Solar. Nice to know even Dr. Wi-- er, I mean, Mr. X likes to keep his carbon footprint low). It is the 4 warriors that have fake bosses on the main level paths, the real ones guarding the Beat plates. One robot each from both sets hold very honorable distinctions of being designed by submissions from fans outside of Japan. In September of 1992 the 40th issue of Nintendo Power announced a contest for design ideas from USA and Canada, passing the submissions along to Capcom. The 44th issue in January 1993 would have a 16-page blowout for 2 Mega Man games (MM5 and the 3rd Game Boy title) along with four pages filled with North American robot designs. By November of that year issue 54 announced 2 winners from their side of the Pacific being placed in the game: Knight Man & Wind Man. This semi-direct involvement in the game's creation help lead to Nintendo itself publishing the game when Capcom USA's involvement with the NES was phasing out. Far be it to help 2 kids get their designs in the game and names in the credits and not allow them to easily beat their own creations themselves. Besides, the redesigned top-loading NES-101 was released and the Big N needed new games to market for it, and Mega Man 6 was shown alongside Zoda's Revenge: Startropics II in commercials for the cheap sleek new model.

Robot Masters

MXN-041 Blizzard Man

A Canadian 3-time Robot Olympic gold medalist in skiing built to monitor weather in the Antarctic, who can manufacture artificial snow. Not too threatening and not much of a fighter, though. His snowflake-flinging Blizzard Attack is slow and easily dodgable, but his rolling attack can be dangerous if Mega Man is too close to a wall. [Weakness: Flame Blast]

MXN-042 Centaur Man

His backstory lists him working at an Grecian museum of antiques. As in working as staff around priceless artifacts while being a half-robo-horse. His uses Centaur Flash, which freezes Mega Man, just like any other time-stopping weapon, before shooting a bullet that breaks into multiple parts when it hits a wall. By far one of the strangest (and easiest) Robot Masters in the series. [Weakness: Knight Crush]

MXN-043 Flame Man

An turban-wearing Arabian robot that runs on oil and is a bit of a gas-guzzler in that regard, which sets a bad precedent for someone who works in a refinery. His fire-pillar Flame Blasts may be hot but he sports a wicked cool 'stache. [Weakness: Wind Storm]

MXN-044 Knight Man

A chivalrous guardsman from merry ol' England. It is said that he smashed 1000 robots with his Knight Crush mace. His shield protects shots from the front, though he isn't too hard to take down with persistence. This knight was designed by Daniel Vallie from Quebec. [Weakness: Yamato Spear]

MXN-45 Plant Man

He watches over a Brazilian botanical garden and is able to talk to plants. It's also stated that this shrinking violet is an overly-sensitive crybaby to boot. His Plant Barrier protects just as well as Skull Barrier, but costs twice as much weapon energy. Lame. [Weakness: Blizzard Attack]

MXN-046 Tomahawk Man

A pastiche of Native American warriors built by the US (in-game, that is. The design winner is Japanese) exclusively for the Robot Tournament. At least he isn't as wacky as the sport-cobbled design of the Gundam Maxter from G Gundam - or any Gundam from that anime. His Silver Tomahawks fly in an upward angle and he can fling sharp metal feathers from his headdress. [Weakness: Plant Barrier]

MXN-047 Wind Man

Those shoulder-mounted prop fans aren't just for show. They can suck Mega Man into his spinning whip-mace braid. Otherwise he hovers with the jet engines built into his feet and fires off 2 propellors. Defeating him nabs Mega Man the ability to fire off tiny tornado-like Wind Storms. His robot represents China, but in real life it was dreamed up by the USA contest winner Michael Leader. [Weakness: Centaur Flash]

MXN-48 Yamato Man

Modeled after a high ranking samurai warrior, he is the wielder of the Yamato Spear and a ton of Japanese spirit. It's too bad he had to sacrifice tougher armor for agility. He also doesn't carry enough spears since he has to run over and pick them up after firing them. He has high respect for Knight Man's valor. [Weakness: Silver Tomahawk]

The earned Robot Master weapons are a tad step up from Mega Man 5's botched selection. Flame Blasts arc down and hit very hard, and can melt a few barriers in Blizzard Man's stage. Wind Storms work like speedier Bubble Leads that send enemies skyrocketing off the screen. Plant Barrier, while one of the worst shield weapons, is still better than Star Crash. Silver Tomahawks fly fast in a nice upward arc for faraway aerial baddies. Centaur Flash is a mild step down from Gravity Hold, but still works wiping the screen clear of weak enemies. Blizzard Attack, while slow, has a nice spread. Knight Crush boomerangs back slowly but can be aimed upwards like a whippable Shadow Blade, and Yamato Spear make for a good buster alternative with some shield-piercing ability. The energy-free Mega Buster and Power Adapter are still strong enough to blaze through the easy game, but at least the special weapons serve better purpose outside of exploiting boss weaknesses. Proto Man is also kind enough to hand Mega Man an useful Energy Balancer item should he find him in a suspiciously blocked hole in the wall in Tomahawk Man's stage.

The fortresses in this game are rather underwhelming, moreso with Wily's. Outside of block-pushing gimmicks in Mr. X's Castle 4, there's not much interesting outside of a few branching pathways for even more powerups. What really shines, though, are some of the big bosses awaiting you, from a huge green robo-Brachiosaurus to a cute Mazinger-Z spoof Met tank Outside of a walking sideways piston boss keeping out of reach they're not all that difficult to bring down. A nice surprise is the ending showing a newspaper proclaiming the mad doctor finally being put in jail for his crimes. Yes, pleading for forgiveness won't work this time, Dr. Wily!

The graphics once again make a step forward with Capcom flexing more visual techniques out of the ancient system. Nowhere is this more apparent than the sunset background in Tomahawk Man's stage, flickering and keeping in place even as Mega Man and the foreground scrolls forward. The developers also weren't afraid to experiment with previously underused color schemes and combinations, decking out Knight Man's castle in lavender, magenta, and lime. The music this time around is heralded by Yuko Takehara, keeping the tingey sound found in Mega Man 5 but incoporating melody elements with the Robot Masters' countries of origins in each piece. The pre-title intro track differs between regions, redone for the US release for unknown reasons.

While not a terrible game by any stretch, Mega Man 6 isn't up to the pedigree brought forth from its earlier works. The changes to Rush break an already easy playthrough and the branching paths don't add quite enough to warrant significant replay value. Many passed up this title for the far superior and radically different Mega Man X at the time, but if obtained cheaply as a download or as part of a collection, the sixth installment can be a relaxing jaunt for an hour or two. Well, except for a brief bout of frustration from the leaping fish in Plant Man's stage.

Quick Info:

Developer:

Publisher:

Designer:

  • Satoshi Murata

Genre:

Themes:


Mega Man 6 (NES)

Mega Man 6 (NES)

Mega Man 6 (NES)

Mega Man 6 (NES)

Mega Man 6 (NES)

Mega Man 6 (NES)

Mega Man 6 (NES)

Mega Man 6 (NES)

Mega Man 6 (NES)

Mega Man 6 (NES)

Mega Man 6 (NES)

Mega Man 6 (NES)


Additional Screenshots


<<< Prior Page

Next Page >>>

Page 1:
Intro
Characters

Page 2:
Mega Man
Mega Man 2

Page 3:
Mega Man 3
Mega Man 4

Page 4:
Mega Man 5
Mega Man 6

Page 5:
Mega Man 7
Mega Man 8
Mega Man & Bass

Page 6:
Mega Man 9
Mega Man 10

Page 7:
Mega Man (Game Boy)
Mega Man II
Mega Man III

Page 8:
Mega Man IV
Mega Man V

Page 9:
The Power Battle
The Power Fighters

Page 10:
The Wily Wars
Mega Man (Game Gear)
Complete Works

Page 11:
Battle & Fighters
Anniversary Collection
Powered Up

Page 12:
Wily & Right no RockBoard
Mega Man Soccer

Page 13:
Battle & Chase
Super Adventure Rockman

Page 14:
Tiger LCDs
IBM PC Games
Rockman & Forte Wonderswan

Page 15:
Rockman's IQ Challenge
Rockman Gold Empire
Rockman Strategy

Page 16:
Mobile Games
Panic Shot! Rockman
Street Fighter x Mega Man

Page 17:
Unreleased Games
The Krion Conquest

Page 18:
Cameos
Other Media
Legacy

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