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Mega Man Classic Series

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Page 1:
Intro
Characters

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Mega Man
Mega Man 2

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Mega Man 3
Mega Man 4

Page 4:
Mega Man 5
Mega Man 6

Page 5:
Mega Man 7
Mega Man 8
Mega Man & Bass

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Mega Man 9
Mega Man 10

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Mega Man (Game Boy)
Mega Man II
Mega Man III

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Mega Man IV
Mega Man V

Page 9:
The Power Battle
The Power Fighters

Page 10:
The Wily Wars
Mega Man (Game Gear)
Complete Works

Page 11:
Battle & Fighters
Anniversary Collection
Powered Up

Page 12:
Wily & Right no RockBoard
Mega Man Soccer

Page 13:
Battle & Chase
Super Adventure Rockman

Page 14:
Tiger LCDs
IBM PC Games
Rockman & Forte Wonderswan

Page 15:
Rockman's IQ Challenge
Rockman Gold Empire
Rockman Strategy

Page 16:
Mobile Games
Panic Shot! Rockman
Street Fighter x Mega Man

Page 17:
Unreleased Games
The Krion Conquest

Page 18:
Cameos
Other Media
Legacy

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Mega Man: The Wily Wars / Rockman Megaworld (ロックマンメガワールド) - Genesis (1994)

Japanese Cover

American Cover Mockup

Seeing the success of Super Mario All-Stars, many companies decided to compile NES classics with updated graphics and sound in hopes to mimic Nintendo's sales. Outsourced once again to Minakuchi Engineering, each remade title runs off the same engine much like in All-Stars, which like the Mario collection leads to slight differences in comparison to the original 8 bit releases. Many important character sprites were redrawn, with Mega Man standing taller than usual, though more or less keeping the same hitbox. This leads to some imprecise movement in the game thanks to the repaint not meshing with the intended coding. And that doesn't even take into account the new bugs. Aside from a random chance for glitched sprites, the major issue is slowdown. Even with the beefier, speedier Motorola 68000 processor, too much motion or sprites onscreen can chug the game down, and many swift enemies are slowed down in the process, like Quick Man and Shadow Man. Controller inputs are delayed as well, making the entire game feel off in general.

The graphics are technically more detailed than before, sporting more colors and shading all around with the Genesis' expanded palette. The game adds in more touches in the level backgrounds, like distant mountains and support girders in Guts Man's stage where there was once merely solid blue nothingness, to blinking mechanical blocks buried in the dirt in Wood Man's stage, to little distortion effects for underwater or heat in Fire Man's and Bubble Man's stages. Unfortunately, many of the redesigns take away some of the original's charm or clash with the sprite details that can hide enemies in the less contrasting backgrounds. For example, Top Man's glass lush leafy walls are now drab metallic blocks and Bomb Man's added chain link fences scour the levels, masking the bottomless pits and dark enemies hiding within them. The music has been upgraded to FM synth by Kinuyo Yamashita, though the compositions aren't necessarily represented any better for it.

In addition to the updated versions of the first three NES games, the developers added a brand-new miniature game with three new Robot Masters and a four-stage Wily Tower to battle through.

MWN-001 Buster Rod G

Based on Sun Wukong from Journey to the West, he's the leader of the Genesis Unit. He attacks and defends with his extending pole and can create after-images of himself. He escapes his first battle and reappears in Wily's Tower.

MWN-002 Mega Water S

The amphibious brains of the G Unit, based on Sha Wujing and the Japanese mythical reptilian demon kappa. He fires off harpoons and protects himself with a water shield.

MWN-003 Hyper Storm H

A big hulking boar bot based on Zhu Bajie. His powerful breath either pulls Mega Man towards him or away into the spiny walls lining his lair. Mets also fall down whenever his hops his heavy frame around. He has the distinction for being the only Robot Master with a double health bar.

With all three games running on the same engine, these new stages cull almost every enemy from the trio of titles, mixing them together like a dream team of baddies to test out all the weapons on. The weapon selection menu before each level allows to choose eight Robot Master special weapons and three utility items from all three games. Obviously, certain weapons and items are more useful than others - why choose Mega Man 2's Item-2 when you can have the superior Rush Jet from Mega Man 3? Also, the breakable barrier walls are only susceptible to their respective weapon, so it's not possible to break a Hard Knuckle wall with Crash Bombs. While Mega Man doesn't earn any powers from the new bosses of the Genesis Unit, it's still a nice little sampler. The ending leaves a lot to be desired, having Mega Man chase Wily on foot while the credits roll, but the bonus levels and their music are underground gems that each feel like a fully fledged Game Boy-style retake of content.

The Wily Wars never saw a cartridge release in North America, and only a limited production run in Europe. The PAL version suffers from a bad conversion to 50Hz, making the game run even slower than ever. A translated release was available in the US, but only through Sega Channel. In 2012, The Wily Wars was one of the games built in along with multiple other Genesis titles in AtGames's Genesis: Ultimate Portable Game Player. However, due to the bad emulation on AtGames' devices, this method of playing the game is far from ideal. Intrepid hackers and coders found that overclocking the Genesis/Mega Drive's CPU or running an overclock-set emulator fixes all the slowdown issues from the dodgy programming, a rare oddity.

Quick Info:

Developer:

  • Minakuchi Engineering

Publisher:

Genre:

Themes:


Mega Man: The Wily Wars (Genesis)

Mega Man: The Wily Wars (Genesis)

Mega Man: The Wily Wars (Genesis)

Mega Man: The Wily Wars (Genesis)

Mega Man: The Wily Wars (Genesis)

Mega Man: The Wily Wars (Genesis)

Mega Man: The Wily Wars (Genesis)


Comparison Screenshots


Additional Screenshots


Mega Man - Game Gear (1994)

Cover

In a somewhat odd turn, U.S. Gold acquired the rights from Capcom to make a Game Gear exclusively Mega Man game. Developed by a team named Freestyle, this title was released solely in North America, and copies stages directly from Mega Man 4 and 5, with a little bit of 2. Much like the Game Boy series, there are only four Robot Masters at the start: Bright Man, Star Man, Napalm Man and Stone Man. Following their defeat is Dr. Cossack's Castle from Mega Man 4, but it consists of the Wave Man and Toad Man stages. Once all six bosses are beaten, it's straight to Wily's Fortress from the fourth game, made up entirely of Quick Man's stage without a Robot Master battle and a tiny two-screen stage from Mega Man 5 straight to the mad doctor Capsule fight.

Though the stages are almost exactly lifted from previous games, there are a few odd omissions and design quirks. Eddie doesn't appear, so energy is simply placed in the rooms in his place. There's also no Beat, so his collectible icons are missing. The added color depth means a little added shading from the original games, but some enemies' palette and sprite work are garishly redesigned. Certain enemies in Bright Man's stage in particular look bloated. Mega Man can only shoot two pellets at once, and many Robot Masters are sped up and fly across the room. Worst of all, the stage layout and graphics are 1:1 with the NES, but the smaller Game Gear resolution means less screen real estate, which leads to extra scrolling, and blind jumps. There are many spikes or pits that cannot be seen coming before the jump. These cheap deaths and lack of any continues makes this game frustrating. The music is also a step down due to the Game Gear's more limited sound chip tech.

The game falls apart near the end, almost as if it was rushed to completion. Quick Man's stage has added crystal tiles to the walls and updated beam spritework, but lacks many of the enemies. The last leg is completely barren and Mega Man teleports away once he walks into the pre-boss shutter doors. The final Wily stage is, as stated, super short with only one enemy, followed by the disappearing/reappearing Wily Capsule battle from Mega Man 5 but with no post-battle bowing, only Mega Man leaping as if he's gaining a weapon. This is right after acquiring Toad Man's Rain Flush, or "Rain Weapon" as its called here, so it hardly gets any use, and it isn't Wily's weakness either. The final screens even show Dr. Cossack's Castle exploding instead of Wily's before going straight to the credits, complete with fireworks.

The whole package reeks of amateur effort, ripping off prior games wholesale and reassembling the pieces without care. There's nothing innovative or new in this port outside of some of the Quick Man stage art. The original titles it lifts from are far superior.

Quick Info:

Developer:

  • Freestyle

Publisher:

  • U.S. Gold

Genre:

Themes:


Mega Man (Game Gear)

Mega Man (Game Gear)

Mega Man (Game Gear)


Additional Screenshots


Rockman Complete Works (ロックマンコンプリートワークス) - PlayStation, PSN (1999)

Rockman PlayStation Cover

Rockman 2 PlayStation Cover

Rockman 3 PlayStation Cover

Rockman 4 PlayStation Cover

Rockman 5 PlayStation Cover

Rockman 6 PlayStation Cover

Given the popularity of the series and the widespread prolification of PlayStation consoles, Capcom ported the six NES titles onto the Sony system in Japan as separate releases, each for the discounted price of 2800 yen. Each game's visuals and music is retained in their original glory in the aptly-titled Original Mode. Where these ports excel is all the extras and additions packed onto the CDs.

The first major update is the ability to save progress in addition to using passwords - a nice perk for the first game - though saved data mimicks the password system of old, so progress can only be saved up to the start of the fortresses. At least Capcom was generous enough to allow eight slots in the all-encompassing single block of data on the memory card per game. Each ported title also contains an enemy database where info is unlocked in tiers as more copies of the same enemy are defeated, including bosses. There's also new and old artwork to earn as completion bonuses as well as an unlockable harder difficulty and a timed boss rush mode to beat all the Robot Masters as fast as possible. There are even added options to tweak button configuration, auto fire, controller vibration, game speed, and difficulty options. The new difficulties don't change much in comparisons to Mega Man 9 and 10, or even America's two challenge modifiers. "Easy" merely lessens the damage taken while Hard increases it, along with removing any and all pick-ups, which can come off rather cheap at times. Oh, and it's possible to scroll between weapons ingame, which is always a plus.

The big game changer in Complete Works is Navi Mode, which is available in each title. In this mode, the energy gauges are changed to match Mega Man 8's level of detail, listing the current amount of lives, little icons of the selected special weapon and the number of charges left. The pause menu is updated as well, listing the full names of each obtained weapon. Hints are given for those needing assistance. Beat and Eddie appear to point the way forward or possibly giving the best route at selected forks in the road. Exclamation marks flash on screen at choice locations, where the select button can be pressed to read advice given by friendly helpers like Roll, Kalinka or Dr. Light. The select button menu also has options to change buttons, adjust the screen, or exit back to the title screen or main menu.

Another added bonus is PocketStation support, which allows players to download PokeRoku onto the device for exclusive mini games that can boost the health and attack power of Mega Man and the Robot Masters in Navi Mode. High level Blue Bombers can have screen-filling energy bars and buster shots wrecking tough enemies that normally would need multiple hits, while at the same time beefed-up Roboy Masters can have the same properties given to them. Now Metal Man can take up to ten Metal Blades before dying while his can kill Mega Man in in two hits. It's even possible to make boosted robots fight with another player's PocketStation to see who's the strongest.

The 10+ year leap in tech came with a few fixes to certain constraints of the 8 bit classics. Sprite flickering was removed and slowdown is almost nil, making certain big boss battles no longer choppy messes. The music and sound effects are spot on, though the BGM sounds a little quieter in conjunction with rest of the audio balance, possibly due to being changed to a PCM stream rather than generated from the NES' 2A03 chip. The lack of competing channels on the sound chip does mean that sounds don't get interrupted, leading to no more audio cut-offs and more overlaps for sound effects. There are a few minor changes or erroneously louder samples such as Mega Man's foot landing SFX in the first game or Hard Man's crushing ground attack in Mega Man 3. There is also the faintest of loading times right before bosses appear or when selecting stages, but they last the fraction of a second and are only noticable to veterans of the originals.

There is a major split between the first three ports compared to the latter, which got even more added content. The biggest addition is a fully rearranged soundtrack in Navi Mode. Rockman 1-3's Complete Works did have choice rearranged selections available with the input of a code (Hold Start + Select when choosing Navi Mode), but there were only a handful of updated tracks altogether, all of them taken from The Power Battle and The Power Fighters, leaving most of the BGMs unchanged. It didn't help that some tracks weren't even based on the originals, like Top Man's arranged score being a rendition of the Intro Stage from Mega Man 7. Not so in the latter games, where every song is given the proper rearrangement treatment, though certain songs like Napalm Man's are still derived from the arcade releases. The Boss Attacks are expanded to Mission Mode, adding time trials for Fortress Bosses and certain stage segments as well, with a Sound Test unlocked upon clearing of all missions. Rudimentary maps of each stage are available in Navi Mode on the Select button screen, and it's possible to play without a helmet in any gameplay mode simply by holding down R2 at the start. There are eight power-ups to unlock, two of which can be chosen for a Navi Mode session, from doubling the amount of weapon energy to jumping higher or speeding up buster shots as well as auto charging the mega buster.

All six games were re-released again under the cheaper PSOneBooks label, nearly halving the price. They were also bundled all together with Rockman X7 in a special collector's box along with pin badges in 2003. These spiffy updated ports were sadly not released stateside until they appeared years later on the PlayStation Network, still untranslated. They were, however re-ported in the Anniversary Collection with proper translations, though lacking many of the bonus features. Even the PSN digital re-releases lack PocketStation support, though it's the least necessary addition. Even just going by each game's Original Mode, these are ports done right, and worth the higher price compared to the downloadable NES originals on Virtual Console for the neat extras.


Rockman Complete Works (PlayStation)

Rockman Complete Works (PlayStation)

Rockman Complete Works (PlayStation)

Rockman Complete Works (PlayStation)


Related Articles


<<< Prior Page

Next Page >>>

Page 1:
Intro
Characters

Page 2:
Mega Man
Mega Man 2

Page 3:
Mega Man 3
Mega Man 4

Page 4:
Mega Man 5
Mega Man 6

Page 5:
Mega Man 7
Mega Man 8
Mega Man & Bass

Page 6:
Mega Man 9
Mega Man 10

Page 7:
Mega Man (Game Boy)
Mega Man II
Mega Man III

Page 8:
Mega Man IV
Mega Man V

Page 9:
The Power Battle
The Power Fighters

Page 10:
The Wily Wars
Mega Man (Game Gear)
Complete Works

Page 11:
Battle & Fighters
Anniversary Collection
Powered Up

Page 12:
Wily & Right no RockBoard
Mega Man Soccer

Page 13:
Battle & Chase
Super Adventure Rockman

Page 14:
Tiger LCDs
IBM PC Games
Rockman & Forte Wonderswan

Page 15:
Rockman's IQ Challenge
Rockman Gold Empire
Rockman Strategy

Page 16:
Mobile Games
Panic Shot! Rockman
Street Fighter x Mega Man

Page 17:
Unreleased Games
The Krion Conquest

Page 18:
Cameos
Other Media
Legacy

Back to the Index