By Kurt Kalata

When Sierra released Kings Quest in 1983, it took the computer gaming world by storm. Sierra had already turned everything topsy turvy a few years prior with Mystery House, the first adventure game to feature visuals. Kings Quest took that idea one step further by changing the viewpoint to the third person perspective, while giving the player an onscreen avatar to control. Instead of typing "N" or "S", you could actually just walk north or south, although all other commands were still text based. It introduced a whole new, hugely detailed world to explore and feel immersed in, even if neither the prose nor the parser were anywhere near the level of Infocom, the reigning text adventure publisher. With the immense success of Kings Quest, Sierra branched out by developing adventure games with other themes, including Police Quest, Leisure Suit Larry, and Space Quest.

Space Quest is more than just Kings Quest with a sci-fi theme. Helmed by two Sierra employees who called themselves The Two Guys from Andromeda - Scott Murphy, the programmer, and Mark Crowe, the artist - Space Quest featured a slightly more off-kilter sense of humor. Instead of a great king-to-be, the hero (whom the player can name, although he is officially named Roger Wilco) is little more than a janitor, and a fairly incompetent one at that. At the beginning of the first game, he survives an attack on his ship only because he decided to take a nap in the closet when he should've been on duty. Most of the games involve poor Roger simply stumbling from incredulous situation to incredulous situation, somehow saving the day at the end.

Or not. Sierra games are known to be particularly punishing to the player, especially when it comes to death scenes. Space Quest takes this and runs with it, with a number of particularly amusingly sardonic ways for Roger to die. At least if you did something wrong, it would tend to garner a chuckle. The narrator is often the most amusing "character" in the game, offering sarcastic commentary on Roger's every action.

Space Quest is also full of references and parodies of various works of science fiction. Part of the fun is trying to pick out the most amusing ones, because there are some pretty obscure entries throughout the series. Starting around Space Quest III, the series also became amusingly self-referential, featuring the real-life creators of the series as captives to be rescued, and goes even further with Space Quest IV, with Roger time traveling through his own (non-existent, sadly) sequels. It's very prototypical of the type of humor found in Matt Groening's and David Cohen's popular animated series Futurama.

Like most adventure games and works of science fiction, Space Quest also excels by creating an entertaining universe filled with unique characters and locations, some of which recur throughout the series. Some of these include Monolith Burger, the interstellar version of McDonalds; Astro Chicken, a series of arcade games made by evil software development house ScumSoft, Inc (which are playable mini-games); the mega villain Sludge Vohaul, Roger's accidental arch-nemesis; and the Gippazoid novelty company, who refuse to forgive Roger for a minor incident committed in Space Quest II.

For all of the detail put into the games, it still falls prey to the bane of adventurer gamers everwhere - completely illogical puzzles. For instance, in one puzzle, you're handcuffed in a room with a guard. To undo your bonds, you just need to grab a nail off the way. That part makes sense, right? Well, in order to defeat the guard, you need to grab a rug off the wall (which initially looks like a poster), toss it on the floor, dance on it, and use the cumulated static shock to disable the guard. Oh, also, the guard is a robot, although the game doesn't actually tell you this. At this point, the narrator even questions Roger whether this was brilliant thinking or just dumb luck. Sometimes, it tends to be the latter. There are also a number of annoying arcade sequences that require pixel perfect movements or quick mousework.

There are six games in the Space Quest series, as well as a VGA remake of the first game, which was typical treatment for many of the more popular Sierra franchises. Other than Mark Crowe and Scott Murphy, one of the key members included Josh Mandel, who contributed some writing and developed much of Space Quest VI, and also worked on the Leisure Suit Larry series amongst other Sierra titles.

Space Quest I (EGA)

Space Quest II

Space Quest III

Space Quest IV

Space Quest IV

Space Quest V

Space Quest Chapter I: The Sarien Encounter - IBM PC / Amiga / Atari ST / Apple II / Macintosh (1986)

EGA Cover

VGA Cover

Space Quest I (EGA)


The first Space Quest episode begins with our hero, Roger Wilco, taking a nap on the closet. This acts of severe laziness ends up saving his hide, as the entire rest of the active crew of his spaceship, the Arcada, has been killed by the Sariens, who have invaded the ship and stolen the powerful Star Generator. After sneaking out and hijacking an escape pod, Roger ends up on the desert planet Korona, where he must evade numerous dangerous creatures, including a spider-like robot sent by the Sariens. Upon discovering a Wizard of Oz-like scientist who lives under the surface, Roger takes his speeder to Ulence Flats (reverse those two words for an almost-clever gag), one of the only establishments on the planet. After playing it big at the Slots of Death (getting triple skulls results in being vaporized) and overhearing the location of the Sariens, Roger affords himself the luxury of a navigational robot and spaceship, and heads off to disable the Star Generator himself.

Space Quest I comes in two flavors: the original EGA version, released in 1986, and the updated VGA version, released in 1991. The EGA version uses the AGI engine found in all of Sierra's early graphic adventures, which means low res 160x200, blocky, 16 color graphics, keyboard/joystick movement (meaning no mouse control), full text input, and in the DOS version, PC speaker sound. The VGA version uses the SCI1 interpreter, which means 256 color graphics with a 320x224 resolution with painted backgrounds, a fully icon-based interface with mouse control, and support for sound cards for music and sound effects. Long time fans may prefer the original release for nostalgia reasons, but anyone playing the series for the first time will probably prefer the VGA version - it's much nicer looking and more user-friendly.

The plot remains unchanged in the remake, and only a few of the puzzles have been slightly altered due to new interface. In some ways, though, more could've been done to fix it up for the re-release. Compared to the relatively expansive and free roaming worlds of Kings Quest and Leisure Suit Larry, Space Quest is awfully short and linear. This is actually a blessing in disguise, since there are nearly a dozen different instances where you can miss a vital item and find yourself in an unwinnable situation. Unless you go through with a FAQ, you'll probably be reloading, or even restarting, several times.

The graphics in the remake have the feel of a cheesy sci-fi B-movie, which suits the game perfectly. The VGA version features the usual Walk, Use and Talk icons, but introduces the Smell and Taste icons. These don't have any real use other than provoking a few humorous responses, although they're (slightly) better utilized in Space Quest IV. The VGA remake includes a magnet item which helps you rig a slot machine at the bar. In the original EGA game, you needed to play your luck - a bit tough, considering that you're killed if you happen to get three skull and crossbones. The VGA version also (thankfully) lets you skip the skimmer arcade sequence, although it chastises you for doing so.

One of the jokes has also been changed. In the EGA version, if you pushed the "Do Not Press" button in the escape pod, you end up transporting to Daventry Castle in the first Kings Quest game. In the VGA version, you end up outside of Nottingham Castle from Conquests of the Longbow, which was a more contemporary game at the time the remake was released.

Given that it's the first game in the series, Space Quest hadn't exactly found its voice yet. It's certainly funny, but other than a slightly sarcastic narrator and some mildly funny death scenes (including one in the VGA version where the Two Guys pop up and announce an instant replay of one of Roger's particularly stupid moments), it's not really as hilarious as its sequels. The VGA version adds a lot more location and event descriptions, at least.

Most of the humor comes from references to pop culture and other sci-fi series. The bar in Ulence Flats features alien versions of the Blues Brothers and ZZ Top, although the latter was changed in the VGA version due to a complaint from the musicians themselves. The EGA version features PC speaker renditions of the Blues Brother's theme and ZZ Top's "Sharp Dressed Man", while the VGA version features different but similarly styled pieces of music.

When shopping for robots in the VGA version, you'll find a number of classics, including the Robot from Lost in Space, Robby the Robot from The Forbidden Planet, and a creature that looked like it stepped out of Laputa: Castle in the Sky called Hay-A-O, a reference to the film's directory, Hayao Miyazaki. The arms dealer on the Sarien ship also sounds suspiciously like Marvin the Paranoid Android from Douglas Adam's Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series. The robot stop itself was named Droids R Us in the EGA version, but changed to Droids B Us in both future revisions and the VGA version due to a lawsuit from the toy retailer. Strangely, the VGA version goes one step further and features a green giraffe that looks suspiciously like Jeffrey, the Toys R Us' mascot.

MP3s Download here

Main Theme (VGA)

Space Quest I (EGA)

Space Quest I (EGA)

Space Quest I (VGA)

Space Quest I (VGA)

Space Quest I (VGA)

Space Quest I (VGA)

Space Quest I (VGA)

Comparison Screenshots

EGA

VGA

Space Quest II: Vohaul's Revenge - IBM PC / Amiga / Atari ST / Apple II / Macintosh (1987)

American Cover

Space Quest II

Space Quest II


It seems like Roger just can't catch a break. Ever after saving the galaxy from the Sariens, he's once again reassigned to his old janitorial position on a space station. Things just get worse when he's kidnapped by Sludge Vohaul, the secret mastermind behind the Sarien attack. Sludge was none too happy to have his plans foiled, and he's at it again - his next plan consists of flooding the population with cloned life insurance salesman. Of course, he doesn't want Roger mucking it up, so he sentences him a life of slavery, working in the cruel mines of Labion. In the course of being transported, the incompetent guards end up crashing their transport, leaving Roger free from their grasp, but trapped in a deadly jungle.

The planet of Labion is infested with all kinds of flora and fauna that would be happy to have Roger as its lunch. In one particularly aggravating section, you need to carefully navigate through the tentacles of a particularly ravenous beast. It's an extremely narrow path, and if one of your feet so much as touches one of its pixels, you're pretty much screwed. Just be prepared to save every few steps. Later, you need to navigate through a series of tunnels, almost completely in the dark, within a time limit, only aided by a glowing gem that illuminates your immediate area.

Assuming, of course, that you had explored the swamp enough to find that ONE tiny area that was deeper than the others, and had the foresight to dive underwater and find said gem. Also, you had better made sure that you'd searched the locker right at the beginning of the game, or else you'll miss the Rubick's Cube-like puzzle and jockstrap that are necessary in the later stages of the game. And remember to order the Labion Terror Beast Mating Whistle in the jungle, a pivotal moment in Space Quest canon. (In successive games, the manufacturer of this whistle tries to hunt down Roger, since he didn't pay for it. This is particularly odd because the mail order form specifically mentions that it's free. Whether this is commentary on the hilariously entangled bureaucracy of the corporate world or simply an oversight by the developers, is up for you to decide. The Two Guys have admitted to the mistake, but the former explanation is funnier.)

If you manage to do all of this properly, you'll find yourself on Vohaul's secret base inside an asteroid. The only way to beat him is by raiding all of the janitor's closets (and the bathroom) for various household items, then using them to scheme your way through Vohaul's devious traps. Along the way, you encounter a not-quite-vicious Alien creature whom you briefly make out with (against your will), essentially putting an invisible timer on the final stages of the game. (Assuming you've seen the movies, you can probably guess what happens if you take too long.)

Space Quest II really isn't much of an improvement of the original - it uses the same AGI engine, and the puzzles are just as aggravating, if not more so. It does, however, have some pretty creative death messages, which halfway excuses the huge amount of pain you'll have to put Roger through. It's a bit comforting to know that the monster that just ate you will have gastrointestinal distress for rest of the evening and make itself unpopular amongst the rest of their friends. It's moments like these that make it somewhat worthwhile, but only die hard Space Quest fans will see it worthwhile to the conclusion, especially given the anticlimactic ending.

Space Quest II

Space Quest II

Space Quest II

Space Quest II

Space Quest II

On to Page 2

Back to the index