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Fantasy Zone

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Fantasy Zone II
Fantasy Zone II DX

Page 3:
Fantasy Zone: The Maze
Galactic Protector
Fantasy Zone Gear
Super Fantasy Zone
Space Fantasy Zone

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Fantasy Zone II: The Tears of Opa-Opa / Fantasy Zone II: Opa-Opa no Namida (ファンタジーゾーンII オパオパの涙) - Master System, Arcade, MSX, Famicom, PlayStation 2, Wii (1987)

Japanese Master System Cover

Famicom Flyer

American Master System Cover

Famicom Cover

Fantasy Zone II was designed specifically for the 8-bit Master System, and shakes up the formula in a few ways (its subtitle, The Tears of Opa-Opa, was dropped in the Western releases). There are, once again, eight stages: Pastaria, Sarcand, Hiyarika, Bow Bow, Chaprun, Fuwareak, Sbardian and Wolfin. Each level is broken down into several subsections that you switch between by running into warp points. Once you've cleared all of the bases in the level, you need to track down the special red warp point to encounter the boss. This is all extremely aggravating, because there's no radar, so you tend to wander around until you find some enemy generators to kill, and hopefully remember where the red warp point is to finish off the level.

The shop balloons are gone too, replaced with stationary "shop clouds" located at specific points in each level. Each shop also carries different items, with a few power-ups new to this game, like the Shield. The upside is that you can visit the shops any time you want. The downside is that when you respawn from a death, you'll be extremely underpowered until you find them. Some special power-ups are also hidden in the scenery. Additionally, there's a Power Meter, allowing you to absorb more than one bullet before dying; directly colliding with foes will still kill you instantly though, until you find some items to extend it.

The background designs are even crazier than before, and show off some of the most colorful graphics on the Master System. Still, while the graphics are great for the system, it's a huge step down from the arcade version of the first game. Furthermore, the music is a chirpy, terrible mess, which is especially a shame after the original's catchy tunes. The FM synth soundtrack in the Japanese release is easier on the ear, but still isn't very good. Fantasy Zone II was also released in the arcades on the System E board, although it's practically identical to the SMS version, with a few changes. It replaces the "Power" meter with a radar. However, even though it shows the locations of the pods, it doesn't highlight where you are. Each level is also timed, with a little "life" indicator that slowly counts down to zero. You can only take a single hit before dying, though any seconds left when completing a level will generate extra gold.

Fantasy Zone II was also ported to the Famicom and MSX2. Both are quite inferior to the SMS version, with terrible graphics, even worse music, constant slowdown, and in the case of the MSX2 version, choppy scrolling.

Quick Info:

Developer:

Sega

Publisher:

Sega

Genre:

Shoot-'em-up: Horizontal

Themes:

Cute-'em-up
Protagonist: Robot
Wacky


Fantasy Zone II (Master System)

Fantasy Zone II (Master System)

Fantasy Zone II (Master System)


Additional Screenshots


Comparison Screenshots


Fantasy Zone II DX: The Tears of Opa-Opa - PlayStation 2, 3DS (2008)

Fantasy Zone Complete Collection Cover

The fact that Sega designed Fantasy Zone II for the Master System rather than the System 16 board was quite a disappointment. So with the 2007 release of the Fantasy Zone Complete Collection, Sega and M2 went the extra mile to make good on this old mistake, by creating Fantasy Zone II DX.

It's actually a remake, but not any old remake - similar to Game Center CX / Retro Game Challenge and Mega Man 9, it's a brand new game developed using retro-style graphics. Rather than simply mimicking the low-res pixel art, the developers actually programmed it to be compatible with the System 16 hardware. They created a new revision of the board, called System 16C, which has more RAM than the original A and B revisions, but is otherwise functionally similar. They even burnt ROMs for use at some promotional events in Japan, and the game is currently emulated in MAME. As a result, it features an aesthetic style exactly like the original, except even more colorful and surreal.

M2 did more than just upgrade the graphics, as they fixed up the other missteps. In the original Fantasy Zone II, each level consisted of several subsections each with a unique background, which you could transport between via warps. This has been changed so each level has a "Bright" and "Dark" rendition - the Bright level is the default version, but the Dark equivalent has different graphics and enemy patterns, and even tougher bosses. The Dark stages are so scary you won't find the standard Shop balloons either, and need to scavenge for hidden shops to buy things. In the Bright levels the shops pop out at the beginning of each stage/life as in the other games, so you don't need to hunt them down anymore.

Prince of Darkness

You technically never need to enter the Dark areas, but enemies give more money, and completing these stages is the only way to get the best ending. There are three endings in total - in the bad one, where Opa-Opa turns evil, it even references the Harrier and Uriah from Space Harrier as coming to destroy him, further tying together the two series. Of course, in tightening up the levels, a lot of the crazier backgrounds from the original Fantasy Zone II unfortunately had to be ditched, but the developers picked the best and used those as a basis.

Further tweaks have been made in other areas. Opa-Opa controls slightly differently, as there's a brief animation of him turning around when switching directions. The Power meter is gone, but if you take a hit with a special weapon equipped you'll lose the weapon though still survive, which makes things a little bit easier. Usage of super bombs like 1 Ton weights are now unlimited, though they need to be charged for about a second before they can be dropped. All of the bosses are taken from the original Fantasy Zone II; they're not exactly new, but their attacks have been changed so they're like older siblings of the bosses from the first Fantasy Zone. Each stage opens with a unique Engrish-y introduction text, similar to the one that displayed in the first level of the first game.

The soundtrack technically consists of updated music from Fantasy Zone II, but it's all been so heavily rearranged you can barely tell. It uses the same FM synth as the first game, and is provided by veteran shooter soundtrack composer Manabu Namiki (Metal Slug 6, Dodonpachi Daioujou, the Konami ReBirth series, many Cave games). There are more weapons this time around too, including the eponymous "Drop Tears", which are required for the best ending. You even get the option to buy speed enhancements after getting killed by a boss, fixing one of the most aggravating aspects of the series. This might actually be the best Fantasy Zone yet.

The 3DS version, released in 2014 under the name Fantasy Zone IIDX Double, includes the same widescreen view and 3D effects as the first game. It also includes a new score attack mode called Link Loop Land.

Quick Info:

Developer:

Sega

Publisher:

Sega

Genre:

Shoot-'em-up: Horizontal

Themes:

Cute-'em-up
Protagonist: Robot
Remake
Wacky


Fantasy Zone II DX (PlayStation)

Fantasy Zone II DX (PlayStation)

Fantasy Zone II DX (PlayStation)

Fantasy Zone II DX (PlayStation)


Additional Screenshots


Comparison Screenshots


<<< Prior Page

Next Page >>>

Page 1:
Fantasy Zone

Page 2:
Fantasy Zone II
Fantasy Zone II DX

Page 3:
Fantasy Zone: The Maze
Galactic Protector
Fantasy Zone Gear
Super Fantasy Zone
Space Fantasy Zone

Back to the Index