<div class=header> <div class=headerrow> <div class=headercell> <div class=headerlogo> <p class=image><a href="http://www.hardcoregaming101.net" target="_parent"><img src="http://www.hardcoregaming101.net/logo/hg101logo.png" alt="Logo by MP83"></a></p> </div> <div class=headerad> <script type="text/javascript"><!-- google_ad_client = "pub-5230184257141993"; /* HG101 */ google_ad_slot = "4961941287"; google_ad_width = 728; google_ad_height = 90; //--> </script> <script type="text/javascript" src="http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/show_ads.js"> </script> </div> </div> </div> <div class=headerrow> <div class=headercell> <div class=headermenu> <a href="http://www.hardcoregaming101.net/alpha.htm" target="_parent">Articles</a> | <a href="http://www.hardcoregaming101.net/features.htm" target="_parent">Features</a> | <a href="http://www.hardcoregaming101.net/books.htm" target="_parent">Books</a> | <a href="http://blog.hardcoregaming101.net" target="_parent">Blog</a> | <a href="http://hg101.proboards.com/" target="_parent">Forums</a> | <a href="http://www.hardcoregaming101.net/about.htm" target="_parent">About</a>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Hardcore-Gaming-101/109837535712670" target="_blank"><img alt=" " src="http://www.hardcoregaming101.net/facebook.png"></a>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://twitter.com/HG_101" target="_blank"><img alt=" " src="http://www.hardcoregaming101.net/twitter.png"></a>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://ask.fm/hg_101" target="_blank"><img alt=" " src="http://www.hardcoregaming101.net/askfm.png"></a>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://www.patreon.com/hg101" target="_blank"><img src="http://www.hardcoregaming101.net/supportsmalla.png"></a> </div> <div class=searchbox> <form action="http://www.google.com/cse" id="cse-search-box" target="_parent"> <div> <input type="hidden" name="cx" value="partner-pub-5230184257141993:xfg3mydy24k"> <input type="hidden" name="ie" value="ISO-8859-1"> <input type="text" name="q" size="30"> <input type="submit" name="sa" value="Search"> </div> </form> <script type="text/javascript" src="http://www.google.com/coop/cse/brand?form=cse-search-box&amp;lang=en"></script> </div> </div> </div> </div>

<<< Prior Page

Next Page >>>

Page 1:
Mickey & Donald
Donald Duck's Speedboat
Donald Duck's Playground
Donald Alphabet Chase

Page 2:
Donald Duck
Lucky Dime Caper
Donald The Hero

Page 3:
Quackshot
World of Illusion
Deep Duck Trouble

Page 4:
Donald Duck no Mahou no Boushi
Magical Quest 3 Starring Mickey & Donald
Maui Mallard in Cold Shadow

Page 5:
Magical Tetris Challenge
Donald Duck: Goin' Qu@ckers
Disney's PK: Out of the Shadows

Page 6:
Duckburg P.D.: Donald on Duty
Donald Duck Quest
Donald Duck Quest 2
PK: Phantom Duck
Life of D. Duck

Page 7:
Al Lowe discussing Donald Duck
Darlene Lacey discussing Disney
Cameos & Appearances

Back to the Index


Duckburg P.D.: Donald on Duty - Mobile (2007)

Title Screen

It's not uncommon for Donald to change jobs. In fact, it seems almost every cartoon, comic or other piece of media he stars in, he has a brand new job for each of them. So it is only natural for the many video games based around Donald to focus on his ability to hold down a job and excel at it. Donald Duck's Playground and Mahou No Boushi both offered some labor for the hard working duck in interactive form, and in 2007 cell phone developer Living Mobile brought out another title where Donald's work ethics were set to the task in Duckburg P.D.: Donald on Duty.

This time around the eponymous duck dons a traffic officer's uniform and must direct the traffic in Duckburg's busiest intersections. It seems the job is quite the lucrative one because Gladstone has also signed up on the force, and he is in direct competition with Donald to become the best traffic officer in town. The chief at the station sets them up against each other and tells the one that does the best job, keeps it. Throughout 15 levels, it's up to Donald not only to keep the traffic smooth and avoid accidents, but to do so at a better rate than his luck prone cousin. There are two modes of play, Story mode and Survival.

Each level shows an overhead view of an intersection with either three or four traffic lights. The way traffic is directed is by pushing the corresponding key on the phone as assigned on the screen. The amount of traffic coming from each end differs second from second, but it's best to not keep the chauffeurs waiting too long, because they'll get cranky and traffic jams will occur. The faster traffic is directed the more Donald's happy meter rises, and once the meter rises to the top the stage is cleared. Gladstone's meter is shown on screen, and if he achieves success before Donald, it's game over. Between each stage, there is a short story sequence piecing the levels together and telling the story of Donald's rise to be the best traffic officer in town. Eventually the game also makes use of small "Event" sequences, where the player has to press 5 on the keypad to activate it. For example, these events can be that Donald needs to remove snow from the roads, so to do this a small diagram comes up with the numbers 1-6, with some having snow over them. The numbers that have snow on them are the ones players are required to rapidly press in order to clean the roads. The events are optional, but clearing them within a certain amount of time will give Donald's meter a bonus boost.

Even though the game has little to do with Donald and could just as well have been called "Jim Power: Lost in Traffic", it's a pretty addicting little puzzle game that is a perfect fit for something like cell phones. As the game progresses, traffic becomes more and more frantic along with the events, and fingers will suffer since it doesn't really stop being fun even after a few levels. Keeping the reflexes up and maintaining a smooth and desirable flow of traffic becomes a strangely satisfying experience, and the artwork shown between each stage, which is taken straight from various Carl Barks comic books, offer some really nice backdrops for the simple story offered, even if it sometimes doesn't really have much to do with the dialogue. Even after the 15 levels are over with, Survival mode gives longevity to the game with its rapid rise in difficulty.

It's a perfect little game to have on a bus or waiting for your bail officer to come let you out after a wild night on the town. It's an extremely simple idea and execution is just as light, but it never presents itself as anymore than a fun little pastime puzzler.

Duckburg P.D.: Donald on Duty (Mobile)

Duckburg P.D.: Donald on Duty (Mobile)

Duckburg P.D.: Donald on Duty (Mobile)

Duckburg P.D.: Donald on Duty (Mobile)


Donald Duck Quest - Mobile (2007)

Title Screen

Living Mobile weren't done with their escapades featuring the famous duck after just one title. The next game they developed was another interesting puzzle game titled Donald Duck Quest.

The premise of game is quite simple. Players guide Donald through a maze in order to save one his nephews who's managed to get lost. This time around, Donald is not directly controlled through input, rather arrows are placed around the play field which changes Donald's direction upon stepping on the positioned arrows. Each level offers a specific number of arrows which can be used to reach the lost nephew. Once all the arrows are placed, it starts the sequence where Donald walks as directed by the assigned arrow and should it be wrong, he simply returns to his default position and the arrows are reset, allowing the player to rethink his approach and figure out the proper route. In the beginning the stages are very simple, but it quickly adds new elements to overcome, like potholes or keys to open locked doors.

There's nothing really wrong about Donald Duck's Quest, though it gets a bit tiresome after a while just placing arrows and watching Donald just walk over them time after time. The puzzles remain fun for the duration they last, though the length of the game is quite short, and never really gets too difficult. A short time waster if anything, though with functional gameplay.

Donald Duck Quest (Mobile)

Donald Duck Quest (Mobile)

Donald Duck Quest (Mobile)


Donald Duck Quest Deluxe - Mobile, Web Browser (2007)

Browser Splash Screen

Cell Phone Title Screen

A follow up to Donald Duck Quest was released fairly quickly after the first game, though still with its own set of enhancements and special features. This time around the game had a system that linked it with a browser version of the game.

Both the browser and cell phone game play the same way, though the puzzles are different. The cell phone game has quite a few more stages this time around, while the browser game has 42 stages. However, this is where the interplay between the games comes into play. In order to access levels 11-42, players are required to beat the cell phone game in order to obtain a level code which they then are required to type into the level code field when asked. Beating levels 1-10 will simply open a locked page which asks for the code to be input into the field in order to progress. Even though the browser has higher resolution and infinitely better graphics capabilities than phones at the time, the cell phone version still looks and sounds much much better and is the better game between them. It also features a short cut scene before the game starts with some impressive graphics.

Even with the extra levels and new obstacles, it also a leaves a rather sour taste in the mouth that the game is such a cheap marketing scheme, requiring players to seek out the cell phone version should they like it in order to play the full game, with no assurance that even if one does find the game, that it will actually be compatible with the cell phone brand one might have. But even if it is a cheap marketing ploy, it's at the very least a fun one to play. As an added bonus, the cell phone game comes with all the levels from Donald Duck Quest, so it is basically two games in one.

Donald Duck's Quest Deluxe (Browser)

Donald Duck's Quest Deluxe (Browser)

Donald Duck's Quest Deluxe (Browser)


Mobile Screenshots


Phantom Duck - Mobile (2008)

Title Screen

The last Donald Duck game to date was released in 2008 and was developed by the now defunct Disney Mobile game development group, located in Czech Republic. During the short span of time they were in operation, a few games were released onto their network that went completely under the radar. One of these was a 2D side scroller featuring none other than PK, Donald's Italian super hero alter ego. Due to the rise of the iPhone and its superior handling of games and applications, the Java based games which were being released at the time died a quick and unnoticed death.

PK: Phantom Duck harkens back to the SNES days with large colorful sprites, fast side scrolling action and detailed backgrounds. It features the highest resolution regular Nokia and Sony Ericsson models could render at the time at 240x320.

While the last PK game on PlayStation 2 and GameCube was based on the PKNA comic books from the '90s, Phantom Duck takes more material from the old PK comic books, making Gyro Gearloose the trusty sidekick and gadget developer once again instead of Uno the super computer, and taking place in a futuristic yet more contemporary looking Duckburg. The Beagle Boys and their head honcho, Grandma Beagle, are out doing crime when PK is on the prowl to hunt them down, only to be beaten out by the Duckburg security robots. Doubting himself and Duckburg's need of a superhero, it's quickly revealed that the Beagle Boys have in fact rewired the town's security bots to allow them free reign at committing crime, only to be "caught" so that PK stays away, believing the case has been solved. As PK discovers the truth and sets out to stop them, the Beagle Boys program all the robots to go against him, making his search a most dangerous one.

The story line is told through in game dialogue windows and cut scenes between levels with seamlessly piece together the quite good and interesting storyline in the form of comic book panels, all with great detailed art worthy of a comic book inspired property. All of PK: Phantom Duck is actually some of the very best graphics ever seen on the classic cell phone models, easily rivaling some of the prettier side scrollers on SNES and Genesis, featuring some really luscious animations on PK's many actions. The backgrounds are usually really detailed though static, and even as impressive as they are, they are often recycled due to space constraints.

On the offensive side, you can jump on the enemies's heads and you can make use of your trusty blaster. Your blaster has a different function on each level, starting as a simple stun gun (with rebounding bullets) and evolving through various functions including one in which you can encase enemies in bubbles so that they float away.

PK's abilities depend on the stage and situation he finds himself in, but normally he can leap and glide through the air, shoot with his upgrade able gun and climb the walls with his trusty toilet plungers ninja style. Controls are done with the keypad, with the center 5 key acting as the action button while the surrounding keys controls his movement. Even though the controls are not on the most desirable format and the keypad controls are notorious for being awful for gaming, this game somehow manages to pull it off and offers very responsive and satisfying controls.

The game also has a surprising length to it, taking longer than the usual cell phone romp to fully beat. PK has to track down many of the Beagle Boys one by one, but the robots keep sidetracking him by stealing his car and other mischievous actions which constantly puts him at edge. There are several boss battles which are all different from each other, and are actually the most fun of the entire game due to the change of pace and controls, with PK having to use his cape as a catching bag to repel bombs back into the air or push crates onto a boat to make it sink due to being overloaded. The difficulty is always fairly well balanced, and in all it really does remind of an above average game on a 16-bit console. In addition to the standard levels, there are also some bonus stages that can be unlocked by collecting enough tokens. Some stages also make use of new unlockable abilities, like bubble floating or sky gliding.

Most of the issues that can be found in the game are rather faults of the platform rather than the design of the game. Enemies are always the same three robots that the Beagles have ordered to take out PK, and disposing of them gets repetitive after a while due to the patterns and looks always being the same. The limited view due to the screen size also leads to some deaths due to jumping straight into gaps or pits that simply are not visible. The lack of backgrounds also tend to make the stages feel the same with just a few slight variations between them at times, though for the most part the stage design is very well done.

It's almost impossible to wrap ones mind around the fact that a very small team of cell phone developers for a largely ignored service would do such an astronomically better job at presenting PK and creating a functional game, on a cell phone mind you, than what a world spanning big budget company was able to do on the then most powerful systems on the market. PK: Phantom Duck is quite an amazing achievement considering all it had going against it, and its truly a shame the game wasn't ported onto the Nintendo DS with improved graphics and additional levels to make it a fully featured game. It wouldn't have been the best side scroller in the DS library if it was brought over, but it would have been a damn fine one. Interestingly enough, the game was produced by Jan Herodes, the very same Herodes that for seven years was the chief editor on LeveL, Czech Republic's most popular game magazine.

PK: Phantom Duck (Mobile)

PK: Phantom Duck (Mobile)

PK: Phantom Duck (Mobile)

PK: Phantom Duck (Mobile)

PK: Phantom Duck (Mobile)


Life of D.Duck - Macintosh, Windows (2005)

Windows Cover

Bjornar B. is a truly gifted individual. Though little is known about him, it's clear that he's a young man of many talents. His greatest strength is his ability to draw some of the most wonderful illustrations since Monet needed new glasses and got the wrong prescription. Yet with the ability to draw and create anything he desires, Bjornar only wants to draw one thing - Donald Duck. In fact, his life goal is to work at Disney and gift them with his talents and love which only he can bring into the Disney family. If one has the fortunes of actually speaking to the man of mystery, shock and amazement would fill the heart due to B's mastery of the English language, spoken and written to perfection.

To witness the amazing illustrated talents of Bjornar, look no further than this portrait picture of his inspirational guide and hero, Donald Duck:

Yeeeeeeeah... scratch that last paragraph of the list. Bjornar B. was actually one of the earlier widespread internet memes, most likely from the minds of the Something Awful community. The website used to make people believe in Bjornar's supreme talents were filled with kid-like drawings, often completely unintelligible, depicting Donald doing some kind of activity like cooking eggs or driving a car. Another trademark was the horrific English used throughout the site which was not only marred with grammatical errors and misspellings, but would also have random Norwegian words mid-sentence (or Swedish depending on the proficiency of the writer behind it), making for extremely humorous results.

This meme eventually led two guys using the names Bjornar B. and Audun R. to develop a freeware PC game based on Donald Duck and the old website drawings. (Despite sharing the same given name and middle name initial, the programming of the game was not done by yours truly. If I ever met this Audun R. however, I would probably break into tears and proclaim I finally know how it feels when doves cry.)

The story is as thin as the paper the art was drawn on. One day, Uncle Scrooch and his wife (Aunt Scrooch?) are driving down the road when they suddenly go past an abandoned duck egg and stop to check it out. Aunt Scrooch quickly realizes she is, of course ,the grandmother of the egg, and wonders how it got there before taking it with her home. Upon hatching, the little duck inside jumps out and proclaims he is D.Duck and he has only one thing on his mind. The one dream he has had all of his seven second long life, is to win the Andecity (And = Duck in Norwegian) marathon. He asks his grandma how he can win the race and the answer is simple: make some oat porridge and he will grow strong enough to win. But to harvest the oat, he needs to find the osthovel to cut it first ("osthovel" is a Norwegian cheese slicer, meant to slice thin pieces of cheese for sandwiches). As soon as his plucky feet leaves the egg shell, D.Duck sets out to find to find the osthovel and explore the wonderful world around him.

The game plays like a point 'n click adventure game out of the early '90s, much like the great Monkey Island. D.Duck has several actions to choose from allowing him to talk, look to use objects and items around the land. Several characters are scattered around the little town for D.Duck to interact with. While talking, a small interface pops up which allows players to choose what D.Duck is to say to the person he is talking to. There are plenty of MI-style puzzles, requiring D.Duck to find an item and use it in the right situation and place. The game was made with the Adventure Game Studio engine.

All the graphics are hand drawn, and crude to say the least. Everything is out of proportion, childishly drawn and never done in perspective. At times, even wrinkles in the paper and other smudges can be seen. The ducks look like things out of the darkest nightmare in a serial killers mind, having razor sharp shark teeth, lazy eyes and they move in choppy, surreal ways, throwing their necks practically off their bodies whenever they talk. Yet there is somewhat of a logic to the chaos of the art style, and in its insanity, it also finds a strange consistency that makes it as appealing as it is disturbing. It looks horrible, but that's exactly the point, and it works in its favor. The music is great as well, but this is due to it being directly ripped from Commodore 64 games like Asterix And The Magic Cauldron and Yogi Bear, played through an emulator SID player.

The dialogue however, is the true meat of the game, and goodness is it ever as horrible as the art. D.Duck and his friends speak in the most jumbled, gibberish infested English, riddled with the most painful grammatical errors and structured without any logic. Anyone who D.Duck talks to or any object he looks at will produce a dialogue which will confuse and make one pinch his ears thinking that his sanity has taken a vacation. A prime example of this is when D.Duck talks about the large tuba which hangs on his wall. He has no need for it, you see, because he is not going to drill for oil. The opening cinema with Aunt Scrooch is just as mind bendingly confusing as most of D.Duck's uttering, with her reasoning for being the grandmother of D.Duck being the most random, and awesome, plot point ever. D.Duck is also obsessed with nutrition, which he makes a point of establishing every second of his life.

It's all a big joke, but even though it's made with not an ounce of serious intention, it still is a fully functional and addicting adventure deep down. The biggest problem is that a lot of the humor is based on Norwegian stereotypes, which isn't exactly the most widespread, but its done broad enough that it can come of as funny to anyone who enjoys humor of pointless nature. It doesn't have anything to officially do with Donald, but plenty of the characters and obviously the lead hero is deeply rooted in Donald Duck's image and story. There is even a small throwback to Donald Duck's Playground in the game where D.Duck has to pass the train tracks, so do make sure to look both ways before passing over. It's a relatively short game as well, but be warned that the ending is a true test of patience, more so than any other game in history. As they say though, with great patience comes great reward, and Life Of D.Duck rewards you with the most beautiful poetry, if it was written by a stoned 5 year old that is.

Life of D.Duck (Windows)

Life of D.Duck (Windows)

Life of D.Duck (Windows)

Life of D.Duck (Windows)

Life of D.Duck (Windows)

Life of D.Duck (Windows)


Life of D.Duck II - Macintosh, Windows (2008)

Windows Cover

The first Life of D.Duck was a relatively short game, with a great touch of unique humor through its zany dialogue and disturbing child like art. It caught the attention of many indy game lovers and attracted itself a small cult following, much like the drawings had before it. But what if there was a bigger adventure, with better graphics, more dialogue, larger cast of characters and more intricate puzzles? Well that's exactly what Life of D.Duck 2 was, released three3 years after the first freeware adventure. The credits again go to Bjornar B. and Audun.R, though whether or not it is the same people behind the names remains uncertain.

D.Duck is now grown up, living in his own big house along with Grandmother Duck and his three nephews, Ooie, Lui and Devie. He has also fallen in love with the local hottie, Dasy, whom he wants to wed and spend his life with. His idyllic life gets disrupted when Uncle Jubalon, the fat soda drinking duck from the first game, decides to come over and eat D.Duck out of his own house for reasons never explained. Dasy is none too pleased with the unexpected visitor and tells D. that unless he gets rid of his offensively obese uncle, she will be with Lucky Cousin Anton instead. When things seemed to like they couldn't possibly get worse, Ooie, Lui and Devie have escaped from their cage with the crowbar D. gave them for Christmas and are hiding around town. It's up to D.Duck to get blobbonious Uncle Jubalon out of the house and save his nephews before Dasy decides enough is enough.

There are plenty of new aspects to this game. First, the inventory window is much larger, and D. has to make use of a much wider arrange of items to progress, all of which are more random and unusual than what he found in the first game. Items can also be combined to create brand new items, which proves neccesary more than once throughout the adventure. There is also an overworld map, meaning the length of the game is much greater than its predecessor, with it taking place over seven different locations. The cast is also increased with plenty of supporting characters, bringing Andecity more to life compared to the empty forest area D.Duck's first adventure took place in. All the characters from the first game make an appearance as well. Always the health concious duck, there is also an activity stat screen which can be brought up with the F5 key that keeps tracks of the number of steps and calories that he has burned so far. This is also used to save and load the game.

The graphics are now much more carefully planned and executed, with meticulous attention to how characters move and how the backgrounds accentuate the unsettling mood that has become the trademark of D.Duck. It is still done in a childlike manner, showing no consideration for proportion or perspective, yet everything is carefully placed and positioned to get the atmosphere down right. The animation is the only thing that is downright good, flowing smoothly and sometimes actually having quite a few frames. D.Duck also has many new expressions and sprite variations, changing costumes or having situation specific reactions and stances, giving him a much deeper feel than before. Most of the returning characters such as Jubalon use their old sprite with no real changes made to them, except for a few new frames of animation. Sprites also scale in and out of the foreground, giving some depth to the different locations.

There are 3 stories that are told at the same time with the underlying basis being the removal of Jubalon's planet sized rear end. The puzzles require a lot of thinking in order to be solved, since the objective is much more complicated than harvesting oat. Every screen of the game has one or more puzzle that needs to be solved, often without any rhyme or reason behind them, relying more on illogical solutions with comical results. D.Duck is often required to drive to several locations rapidly in order to solve the puzzles ahead of him, which is done with his trusty 313 car.

But in this sea of improvements and enhancements, something very vital has gone lost. The dialogue. The way the characters speak is in ways very very different from the first game, and not for the better. Overall, every word is still misspelled and sentence structuring is thrown out the window much like D.Duck's towel, but it's not quite the same. Part of the charm of the first game's delusional madness was the interjected Norwegian words mid-sentence, D.Duck's naive and oblivious nature and the illogical nature to the whole game which found a strange logic within its own little world. In Life of D.Duck too, dialogue is more precise, more reasonable and D.Duck, rather than coming off as a loveable goof, actually feels like he the more reasonable person. There are touches of gold in the dialogue still (such as D.Duck out of the blue proclaiming he is gonna become the prime minister) but overall, it falls flat by being too produced and trying rather than being like the first game's script. The Norwegian words is something that only Scandinavians would piece together and understand literally, but the inclusion of those word created a universally understood flow that is sorely missing here.

The plot also suffers big time by being too long. It starts out innocently enough and maintains its humor for a good quarter of the way until it loses track of itself. For a game that bases itself on misspellings and squinted eyes to make out the details that aren't really there, the length results in the plot just losing track of itself and several parts start to drag, with a script that is simply badly written instead of charmfully handicapped. It can be speculated that the individuals who made this game are not the same as the first game, rather, they were inspired and wanted to make a longer adventure but didn't quite get "it" which makes the game suffer.

It's still an marginally above average adventure game with some good sprite work which is clever and unique both artistically and in execution. The soundtrack is a great compilation of C64 music from various games like the first title, using bits from Gerry the Germ, Mayhem in Monsterland and Magic Land Dizzy. Fans of the Life of D.Duck will probably find enough to keep them going until the end with some patience and a half concentrated mind, but in the end it just ends up feeling like a game trying too hard to be a game and losing track of itself. It might be possible that people who didn't enjoy the complete nonsense of the first game, will find more enjoyment in this game due to it having more general direction.

Life of D.Duck II (Windows)

Life of D.Duck II (Windows)

Life of D.Duck II (Windows)

Life of D.Duck II (Windows)

Life of D.Duck II (Windows)


Additional Screenshots


<<< Prior Page

Next Page >>>

Page 1:
Mickey & Donald
Donald Duck's Speedboat
Donald Duck's Playground
Donald Alphabet Chase

Page 2:
Donald Duck
Lucky Dime Caper
Donald The Hero

Page 3:
Quackshot
World of Illusion
Deep Duck Trouble

Page 4:
Donald Duck no Mahou no Boushi
Magical Quest 3 Starring Mickey & Donald
Maui Mallard in Cold Shadow

Page 5:
Magical Tetris Challenge
Donald Duck: Goin' Qu@ckers
Disney's PK: Out of the Shadows

Page 6:
Duckburg P.D.: Donald on Duty
Donald Duck Quest
Donald Duck Quest 2
PK: Phantom Duck
Life of D. Duck

Page 7:
Al Lowe discussing Donald Duck
Darlene Lacey discussing Disney
Cameos & Appearances

Back to the Index