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Page 1:
Mickey & Donald
Donald Duck's Speedboat
Donald Duck's Playground
Donald Alphabet Chase

Page 2:
Donald Duck
Lucky Dime Caper
Donald The Hero

Page 3:
Quackshot
World of Illusion
Deep Duck Trouble

Page 4:
Donald Duck no Mahou no Boushi
Magical Quest 3 Starring Mickey & Donald
Maui Mallard in Cold Shadow

Page 5:
Magical Tetris Challenge
Donald Duck: Goin' Qu@ckers
Disney's PK: Out of the Shadows

Page 6:
Duckburg P.D.: Donald on Duty
Donald Duck Quest
Donald Duck Quest 2
PK: Phantom Duck
Life of D. Duck

Page 7:
Al Lowe discussing Donald Duck
Darlene Lacey discussing Disney
Cameos & Appearances

Back to the Index


Quackshot Starring Donald Duck - Genesis (1991)

European Cover

Japanese Cover

When Sega of Japan initially got the Disney license in 1990, it became clear that the company had a much different take on how to utilize the well know characters in their video games. All the way up until 1990, Disney's games had a reputation of being either overly kiddy and unengaging like Mickey Mousecapade, or just simple education software for the very youngest to enjoy. Sega, on the other hand, had a different idea. Taking the best designers and programmers in-house, their Disney games would be built around the idea of creating a game using the property as their main influence and logically use the signatures and characters in their roles, instead of making a game first and shoehorning in the property as an afterthought. Castle Of Illusion was the first game to showcase this in late 1990, but no game in Sega's Disney series demonstrates their attention to detail and quality as well as Quackshot starring Donald Duck.

Quackshot is often cited as an Indiana Jones inspired adventure platformer. Indeed, Indiana Jones seems to have been one of the major influences on the game's design, being set in a 1930s-style atmosphere, the logo being pretty much a direct copy of that which is used for Indy's logo and of course, Donald himself wears a brown hat and leather jacket. But there is actually more to this style than simply being taken from Indiana Jones, and Sega really went to town with their research and homework to make this game work on a deeper level than what many actually realize at first glance.

Carl Barks was an artist who had worked at the Walt Disney Studios as an inbetweener in the animation department during the 1930s. During his time at Disney, he had also been responsible for half the artwork to Donald Duck's first comic book adventure, Donald Duck Finds Pirate Gold. When the working environment changed significantly due to World War II, Barks actually quit Disney and relocated in hope of starting a poultry farm. In order to fund this, he turned to his hobby of drawing and story writing and pitched the idea of doing Donald Duck comic book shorts to the publisher of Pirate Gold, Western Publishing. He was immediately signed and would go on to make over 500 stories about the Disney ducks. Due to Disney's policy of writers being anonymous, he was recognized as "The Good Duck Artist" until the discovery of his identity in 1959.

Under Barks's pen, Donald became more of an accidental hero. In the cartoon shorts and other media, Donald had always been depicted as careless and sometimes downright antagonistic with his temper always getting the better of him. Under Barks's pen however, Donald was suddenly given a much more balanced character who showcased more humanlike behavior, often being heroic and caring for his friends and family, though he did at times showcase a temper and didn't always have the best intuition. Barks's tales often took Donald to every corner of the world seeking out treasures and lost artifacts of history and was surrounded by many new characters and locations to further blossom the world of Donald. Just a few examples of Barks's creations to the Disney universe would be Duckburg, Scrooge McDuck, the Beagle Boys and Magica De Spell. Stephen Spielberg and George Lucas have openly admitted that one of the inspirations for Indiana Jones was Barks's Duck stories, which is evident at the beginning of Raiders of the Lost Ark where Indy triggers the rolling boulder the same way that the Beagle Boys had done in the Seven Cities of Cibola comic from 1954.

Even though the most obvious and immediate inspiration seems to be Indiana Jones, there are a lot of similarities in the game to the works of Barks and his unique Donald universe. Sega dwelled deep into the archives and managed to piece together a game that not only felt great in terms of gameplay, but also as a Donald Duck product. All the Disney platformers were designed by a Japanese Sega designer who worked under the pseudonym Emirin.

The story starts when Donald goes through Uncle Scrooge's books one day out of curiosity. Just by chance, he stumbles upon a treasure map that leads to the treasure of King Garuzia, the ancient ruler of the Duck Kingdom. Immediately filled with excitement over the fortune this map might lead to, Donald decides to set off on his adventure to find the ancient treasure but unfortunately for him, his discovery and plans are overheard by Big Bad Pete, who gets a head start on the quest ahead. The map Donald found is only partially complete however, so there is no other choice but to travel to the locations shown on the partial map first to figure out the true location. Many of the locations you visit are based on famous characters and places from Barks's comic books, like Transylvania, where you fight Count Dracula; an old Viking ship (The Golden Helmet); Egypt (Donald Duck and the Mummy's Ring); and the South Pole (A Cold Bargain, Frozen Gold). Donald also visits Duckburg and Mexico, which resembles the 1930s time period and settings found in the Indiana Jones franchise.

Donald's quest is determined by a semi linear structure. You are free to travel to any of the location found on the map and explore the level, but often, a special item or upgrade is needed in order to fully complete the level. Donald then sets up a checkpoint flag which allows him to call his plane in the options menu, and also return to the same location when he returns with the required attribute. In order to make it easier to figure out where to go, several characters appear at the checkpoint to give him advice and hints on where to go next. These characters are mostly familiar faces such as Goofy and Daisy Duck in exotic costumes.

The main form of attack is Donald's plunger gun. This gun can be aimed either straight up or at enemies straight ahead. The plunger gets upgraded throughout the game as well. In the beginning the plungers are yellow and is only used to temporarily stun enemies so the heroic duck can casually stroll past without taking damage. Later on, they turn red which allows them to stick onto walls and springboard Donald higher up with a well timed jump. Last, they turn green and can now stick to passing birds so Donald can hold on and cross over great gaps and distances, even though he technically should be able to fly being a duck and all. The plunger gun can also shoot popcorn, which is a three way canon that takes enemies out completely and bubble gum, which can also take out boulders and obstructing blocks. These come in limited quantity however. If Donald collects five chili peppers, he goes into a temper tantrum and runs full speed, taking out everything in his way for a few seconds.

All the levels are packed with enemies and layouts that keep the action going at all times. The most common enemies are Pete's henchmen who will shoot you from a distance, but there are also bomb dropping birds, boxing turtles and Nordic ghosts. There are even some cameos in the enemy roster, as Shere Khan and Kaa The Snake appear at various stages in the game. Though not every level has a boss, most stages contains some form of residing villain for Donald to face before getting the artifact he is in search for. These artifacts are used by going into the start menu and using them at the appropriate location. There is also a "Look" command which often supplies hints and other tidbits with helps Donald figuring out where it belongs.

The levels remain varied and different for each area of the world, with the cityscape providing some rooftop platforming and zip-lining over the telephone lines while the South Pole causes Donald to slide while jumping on the floating ice blocks. There are mines and pyramids with lots of booby traps and even a mine cart section, again referencing Indiana Jones. There are also numerous secret rooms on many of the different sections of the game with lots of energy refills and gum ammo. There's even a bit of puzzle solving to be done, making Donald a worthy archaeologist and adventurer.

Sega took everything that made both Castle of Illusion and Lucky Dime Caper and pull out all the stops with Quackshot. It is a brilliant game on near all aspects. Graphically the game is one of the best looking games on the Genesis, with fantastic color use with Duckburg especially having a somewhat beige industrial feeling, smooth animations, recognizable characters and unique landscapes for each level. The backgrounds are rich and alive, adding a lot of depths and atmosphere at every step along the way. Even though the game was released in 1991, it remains one of the very best looking titles ever put out by Sega on their 16-bit platform. This is not only true for the graphics, but also the sound and music as well. The Genesis can be quite the roller coaster in terms of its audio output, ranging from absolutely amazing to downright offensive. Quackshot features a glorious soundtrack with excellent audio design however, and the soundtrack is also some of the best you will hear on the Genesis, with ragtime fueling the 1930s setting of Duckburg while the rest of the game follows the tradition game music upbeat pop style found in many contemporary platformers. The music was composed by Kamiya Studio, who was also responsible for most of Sega of Japan's Disney outings. On the graphical side of things, this was also one of the earlier titles Thomas Yuda was art director on. Yuda would later go on to design the character Knuckles from Sonic The Hedgehog and also produced several Sonic titles.

Unlike Castle of Illusion, Quackshot did not get a 8-bit conversion, rather Lucky Dime Caper acted as its counterpart and is designed by the same team. It did get two re-releases - one on the Genesis as part of a double pack and one on the Sega Saturn in 1998, though only in Japan as part of the Sega Ages series. Both these releases were along with Castle of Illusion. The Sega Saturn release is emulated and is identical to the Genesis version.

Quackshot came at a time when Sega were definitely in their golden age, and they were able to make gold out of almost everything they touched. Even a game based on Michael Jackson songs became a classic due to their brilliance. It's a game that is found in most Genesis collections due to being so widespread, but for those who don't have it, it's one to keep on top of the "to get list". It's not only one of the best Disney games ever made, but one of the best platformers on the Genesis as a whole.

Quackshot (Genesis)

Quick Info:

Developer:

Publisher:

Designer:

  • Emiko Yamamoto

Genre:

Themes:


Quackshot (Genesis)

Quackshot (Genesis)

Quackshot (Genesis)

Quackshot (Genesis)

Quackshot (Genesis)

Quackshot (Genesis)

Quackshot (Genesis)

Quackshot (Genesis)

Quackshot (Genesis)


Additional Screenshots


World of Illusion Starring Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck - Genesis (1992)

US Cover

Japanese Cover

With all the success that Mickey and Donald brought with their individual adventures, it only made sense to team them up in what would be their biggest adventure yet. World of Illusion was once again spearheaded by Emirin, and the development team remained virtually the same from Castle of Illusion and Quackshot. At this point in time the team called themselves Illusion Shot Pictures and is the same team that went under the name AM7. This game does not use Quackshot much as an influence, rather presenting itself as sequel to Mickey's Castle of Illusion both in terms of art style and gameplay.

Mickey and Donald are traveling magicians who do show acts together. One day during preparations, Donald gets taken by surprise by one of the magic tricks and falls back, back into the curtain, where they find a mysterious magic box. While Mickey is cautious of the box and its unsettling glow, Donald gets restless and wants to make use of it in their act. Before Mickey can stop him, Donald falls into the box and leaves Mickey no choice but to follow him. What awaits them is a magical world which is ruled by an evil magician, who tells our heroes that they will have to learn themselves some new tricks in order to return home to their own world. Luckily for Mickey and Donald, they have their magic cloaks with them in order to defend themselves against whatever awaits them. As you might have guessed, Donald is more reckless in this game than when he appeared to be in Quackshot. His overall behavior, mannerisms and facial expressions are also more in line with the rather ill tempered cartoon character than his mellowed comic counterpart.

World of Illusion takes place across five levels, each usually separated into three or four sections before the boss fight takes place. The worlds are reminiscent to the ones found in Castle of Illusion. Seeing that the duo has been transported into a new mysterious world, there isn't much in the way of recognizable landmarks or places within Duckburg, however the world within the magic box is still very familiar. World of Illusion takes place in a hybrid of classic Disney cartoon worlds, and puts Mickey and Donald is sort of a bizarro Disney universe where they sort of fit in, but at the same time they feel quite out of place. The art design borrows heavily from Disney's Alice in Wonderland. The creatures and characters within the world looks very similar to the ones found in the 1951 Disney classic as well, with the last few levels of the game fully embracing it and pitting the duo against card soldiers and the Mad Hatter. Probably the most interesting cameo is Madam Mim from The Sword in The Stone who randomly appears as a boss late in the game. The rest of the enemy roster consists of original creations though designed very carefully to fit within the Disney standard. Several stages takes inspirations from other Disney classics as well, such as the underwater kingdom from The Little Mermaid and the flying carpet rides in the clouds like Aladdin. It also revisits some ideas from Castle of Illusion with both games starting out in a similar forest area, a spider cave, a library with the protagonist being affected by miniaturization and again using a candy inspired level. Even in the level design, these stages seems to be very similar to their counterparts found in Castle of Illusion.

The background design helps make World of Illusion truly mesmerizing. What really sets this game apart from most other Disney game is the uneasy feeling it gives from the use of foreground and background details, along with the effective color use and lighting effects, giving the game a very surreal and sometimes bizarre mood that again is owed a lot to its roots in Alice in Wonderland. The background and foreground scrolls at different rates than the scrolling of the midground action, and creates a sense of deepness and world within, which often shows small characters or other small details which helps to bring the world truly alive outside of just what takes place right in front of the heroes. Another darker aspect of the game is the fact that the worlds and situations seems to be more nightmarish in basis than the more light hearted areas found in Castle of Illusion. Whether it is the oversized killer pop up books, deep dark underwater caves, Donald getting stuck in tight places or both heroes running in full panic and shivering as they duck down, there are many unsettling details that constantly reinforce a feeling of discomfort and fear. Each level is so diverse and different from the other that it never allows the player to really settle in and take the ride for granted, rather keeping the mind up and alert, always wondering what is next. Another unique graphical detail is the use of weather effects and foreground set pieces which sometimes will make it so you only see the shadows and silhouettes of the characters on screen, which creates some truly awesome visuals and atmosphere.

The crowning achievement of this game and most important to any video game is, naturally, the gameplay. This is where World of Illusion truly shines. Basically, the three modes allow for three different routes. Single player allows for the choice of either playing as Mickey or Donald. They play largely the same, with no differences in their immediate abilites, having the same speed, jump and attack as one another. Mickey has one advantage over Donald however, he is able to crawl under small cracks and through tight spaces, while Donald simply is carrying too much junk in the trunk, and gets stuck when trying. This leads the single player mode to be different depending on which character you choose. Mickey's route is more based around platforming and longer stretches of tranquility, while Donald's route is filled with more immediate dangers, enemies and overall more difficult, to go along with the notion that he is too careless and short minded. The basic attack in the game is a magic cloak which shoots a small stream of magical dust which upon impact, will make enemies into elements and symbols of good like butterflies or flowers. Each level also introduces a new magic spell to help the duo to overcome the dangers ahead of them, like magic bubbles that allow them to breath underwater or stacking card soldiers to create bridges or platforms to venture over big gaps.

The co-op mode is the way the game was truly intended to be played, in that it makes full use of both characters and provides the longest route along with all new challenges. For the most part, two player modes in platformers had always been either taking turns if the other player died or a competitive race to get the most points or pick up the items and power ups scattered around. There was little emphasis on actual cooperation and interaction between the players beyond just killing the baddies on screen and walking in the same direction. World of Illusion does away with any turn taking or competitiveness and requires the players to think together and work together at all times. If Donald gets stuck, it's up to Mickey to pull his large behind out so he can keep up and if one finds themselves on a higher ground than the other, it's up to one of them to lower a rope and drag the friend in need up. The attention to detail here is also very important, as the way Mickey and Donald help each other makes use of a lot of body language and facial expressions that show a lot of care and compassion for one another, leading the game to have a somewhat heartwarming and reassuring emotional aspect in the midst of all the unknown fears and challenges. Like with the individual quests, the co-op route opens several levels exclusive to that mode, often featuring some kind of requirement of working together, either on a two man mine cart or jumping off each other's shoulders. Capcom also tried their hands on co-op platforming in their Disney effort, Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers, released in 1990 on the NES.

The music and sound effects are also top of the line in what the Genesis can produce. A lot of Mickey and Donald's actions are accompanied by individual voice samples, which in many cases sounds like a strangled ostrich on the Genesis, but in this case they sound surprisingly crisp and clear. The compositions are more ambient and atmospheric than what was heard in Castle of Illusion and Quackshot, and helps bring the feeling of the levels out especially the wonderful first stage theme. There are some touches of brilliance in the tracklist also, like the waterfall stage music for Donald, which is a banjo old-time tune with a Donald Duck bickering lead which is quite hilarious. All the music is very appropriate in their context, just not as memorable and catchy as the preceding games. The music was handled by sound producer Lotty and composer MAGURO. Their real names have never been disclosed so it is unknown what other games they have worked on outside of the Disney games.

World of Illusion is an amazing game. It's one of the most solid, well rounded and artistically impressive platformers of the era, and one of the best 2 player co-op games to date. From animation to controls, it's a joy to play and with the three alternate routes, it's versatile enough to be played over and over again. The only minor complaint is the somewhat floaty physics and overall ease of the game. There are in total over a dozen levels, but none get excessively challenging, which is probably due to kids being the intended audience. That should not scare away anyone of more mature age as it never stops being fun, especially with a second player to enjoy the adventure with. In some ways, the usage of Alice in Wonderland is puzzling with a game based around Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck. This might have been because Sega planned on a developing a video game adaptation for Alice in Wonderland, but either got stuck in license difficulties or just opted to use the more established heroes. Whatever the reason for this mixture, it's like peanut butter and jelly, it works wonderfully despite sounding a bit off on paper. A semi-sequel to this game and a direct one to Castle of Illusion, Land of Illusion, was released in 1993 on the Master System and Game Gear. Mickey was the sole playable character in that game, with Donald only appearing in a cameo. World of Illusion was released as I Love Mickey & Donald: The Mysterious Magical Box in Japan.

Quick Info:

Developer:

Publisher:

Designer:

  • Emiko Yamamoto

Genre:

Themes:


World Of Illusion (Genesis)

World Of Illusion (Genesis)

World Of Illusion (Genesis)

World Of Illusion (Genesis)

World Of Illusion (Genesis)

World Of Illusion (Genesis)

World Of Illusion (Genesis)

World Of Illusion (Genesis)

World Of Illusion (Genesis)


Co-Op Gameplay


Beta Differences

A beta version exists on the internet with several differences from what was found in the final released product. A writer by the name Ragey has detailed many of these differences on his website. This beta also contains unused music or different versions of what is heard in the final version.


Deep Duck Trouble Starring Donald Duck - Game Gear, Master System (1993)

Master System Cover

Game Gear Cover

At the very tail end of its mainstream lifecycle, Sega Master System got plenty of great platform games to give it a proper send off and say good bye to the loyal fan base. Sega published games such as Asterix, Land of Illusion and Sonic Chaos all within the early to mid 90s and showed that even with the outdated hardware, they were still able to push out quality titles that were well worth the money. Just like Mickey had gotten his own exclusive sequel in Land of Illusion, Donald also got a brand new adventure on the Master System, Deep Duck Trouble, released in 1993. Emirin returned as the designer, but the game development duties were given to Aspect, who also handled the programming for every Sonic game on the Master System.

Uncle Scrooge returns from one of his many adventures with a sacred pendant which he found on an island during his expedition. Unfortunately for Scrooge, the pendant is cursed, and whoever removes it from its rightful home becomes cursed by blowing up into the size of a blimp, floating around in air and forced to be held down by a string to prevent floating into the blue skies. Once Donald and his nephews discover him floating around, Scrooge orders Donald to take the pendant and return it to the island statue where it belongs. Uncharacteristically, Donald can't wait and sets out immediately on his boat to venture onto the island.

Deep Duck Trouble follows the standard platform game mold and doesn't stray away from any of the game conventions you'd expect to find in a side scroller. Taking place across seven levels with three sections each, Deep Duck Trouble allows the player to choose his own route and pick whichever they may please, except for two final stages inside the temple where you'll find the sacred statue. The levels are also of the usual bunch - forests, lava filled caves, mountain tops, underwater stages and ice caverns. Each stage has an end boss, which like in Lucky Dime Caper is often a wild animal trying to eat Donald. The boss sections are the most unique part of the game as they take place in an "action mode" where Donald is being chased at high speed, and players need to use quick reflexes to not only avoid the boss, but also avoid obstacles along the path he runs.

Donald is a bit more defenseless in this game than in the prior games. Apart from the standard jump-on-the-enemies-head offense, he doesn't have any plunger guns or hammers this around. Rather he can now kick blocks when standing next to them, very similar to Uncle Scrooge's attack in Duck Tales on the NES. Much like that game, Donald can also discover treasures by kicking blocks into walls or create bridges by kicking them into potholes. Donald can take three hits before he throws in the towel, but the game has infinite continues which starts you at the stage select screen. The enemies in this game consists exclusively of wild ravaging animals like bats, killer birds, mountain goats and crabs. No other Disney characters appear outside of the opening and ending cut scenes.

Being produced so late, Deep Duck Trouble definitely offers some of the best graphics you can get on the Master System, and Donald's animations are exceptionally smooth for the system. The characters and backgrounds are also rich and detailed with plenty of personality and depth, though the levels are not overly engaging visually or interactively. There are plenty of items to find, with ice cream cones and roasted chickens replenishing health, while diamonds and money bags ups the high score. There are also 1-ups and chili peppers, which makes Donald invincible and unstoppable in his tracks when consumed. The music was composed by Saori Kobayashi under the pseudonym Satoru Kobayashi, and is sadly a bit on the bland side. Kobayashi would later go on to compose the soundtrack for Panzer Dragoon Saga on the Sega Saturn.

Deep Duck Trouble doesn't quite live up to the standards set before it by Castle of Illusion on the Master System, and suffers from many of the problems that Lucky Dime Caper also suffered from. It's just too easy, short and unimaginative. Beyond the terrific graphics and accessible controls and gameplay, there's just not enough to really capture the magic that many of the other Disney games have and the alternatives are just so much stronger in comparison. The humor and visual presentation of Donald is pretty funny throughout however, and the ending provides a good laugh.

Like most late games on the Master System, a Game Gear port was released. There are no differences between the two versions. Majesco re-released Deep Duck Trouble along with the Game Gear in the early 2000's and as such became very easily found in game stores and supermarkets.

Quick Info:

Developer:

  • Aspect

Publisher:

Designer:

  • Sharusharu
  • Otanuki SP

Genre:

Themes:


Deep Duck Trouble (Master System)

Deep Duck Trouble (Master System)

Deep Duck Trouble (Master System)

Deep Duck Trouble (Master System)

Deep Duck Trouble (Master System)


Additional Screenshots


Version Comparisons


<<< Prior Page

Next Page >>>

Page 1:
Mickey & Donald
Donald Duck's Speedboat
Donald Duck's Playground
Donald Alphabet Chase

Page 2:
Donald Duck
Lucky Dime Caper
Donald The Hero

Page 3:
Quackshot
World of Illusion
Deep Duck Trouble

Page 4:
Donald Duck no Mahou no Boushi
Magical Quest 3 Starring Mickey & Donald
Maui Mallard in Cold Shadow

Page 5:
Magical Tetris Challenge
Donald Duck: Goin' Qu@ckers
Disney's PK: Out of the Shadows

Page 6:
Duckburg P.D.: Donald on Duty
Donald Duck Quest
Donald Duck Quest 2
PK: Phantom Duck
Life of D. Duck

Page 7:
Al Lowe discussing Donald Duck
Darlene Lacey discussing Disney
Cameos & Appearances

Back to the Index