By Rorshacma

When thinking of Japanese RPGs, one will typically think of an anime-styled game like Final Fantasy or Dragon Quest, with linear, story-driven gameplay. This is very different than the typical Western made RPG, where famous games, such as the Fallout series, focus on free roaming adventure and character creation. Nestled somewhere in between these two styles is Squaresoft's SaGa series. A first glance at the series will immediately bring to mind a typical JRPG, with its anime character designs that look similar to many of Square's other series, with Final Fantasy obviously springing to mind. However, delving deeper reveals that the series has just as much in common with Western RPGs, with open ended, free roaming exploration being a key element.

The series is the brain-child of Akitoshi Kawazu, who is also responsible for many of Square's other games noted for an open-ended style of gameplay, such as The Legend of Mana for the PSOne and Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles for the Gamecube. He has always been known for his experimental style of game design, often trying out new, oftentimes strange, features in his games, and he's especially known for being the guy behind the oddball Final Fantasy II for the Famicom. This can easily be seen by how different his takes on the popular Mana and Final Fantasy franchises were compared to the main titles in their respective series. His rather avant-garde manner of game design can be seen throughout the SaGa series. And, while certainly not all of his strange ideas wiund up being gold, it certainly makes for an interesting experience. Another important person associated with many of the games is composer Kenji Ito. First contributing to the soundtrack of SaGa 2 on the Gameboy, he ended up compsing the soundtracks of all but three of the remaining games.

At ten games, plus several remakes, SaGa is one of Squaresoft's longest running franchises. Yet, it has never reached the level of popularity that many of their other series receive. This is especially true in the United States, where the games are largely unpopular. This is perhaps due largely to its rather Western take on exploration, which may alienate many fans of the more typical JRPG. Perhaps, too, it is due to its often confusing, complicated gameplay features, which are not always fully explained in-game. Certainly, Akitoshi Kawazu's experimental gameplay features play no small part in alienating its fair share of potential fans as well.

The SaGa series started off as a fairly standard trio of RPGs on the Gameboy. Although these first three games certainly had their fair share of quirks, they still played in a manner that would be immediately familiar to any fan of Japanese RPGs. However, it was with the release of Romancing SaGa on the Super Famicom that the series began to really establish itself as the strange hybrid of Western and Eastern styles that it became known for. Beginning with that game, and continuing in nearly every game that followed, the series largely tossed linearity out the window. Instead, the player is given the whole game world to explore as he likes, with dozens of quests available that he can accept and complete in nearly any order. As a result of this freedom, the series may, at first, seem to be much sparser in plot than most other JRPGs. However, this is not the case. Rather than having a story presented in a specific, linear manner, the player is instead allowed to find, and piece together, story elements by completing various quests. Each game also contains dozens of recruitable characters, scattered throughout the world. The ability to be able to form your personal dream party out of all of the available characters is one of the most pleasurable elements in the series. The freedom the series gives the player allows for multitudes of possibilities. You can attempt the same game with a completely different party, doing the quests in an entirely different order, resulting in a rather different experience. Thus, replay value has always been one of the series' strongest points.

Further distinguishing itself from other RPGs is the way in which characters develop in SaGa. With the sole exception of SaGa 3 on the Gameboy, the series has never used the typical system of experience points and level ups that most other games in the genre utilize. Instead, character stats will sporadically increase at the conclusion of battle. Although there is an element of randomness to this growth, stats will typically increase as you use related skills in battle. Hence, using magic in combat will often reward you with an increase in intelligence, while attacking with a melee weapon will help increase strength. Equipment, too, has always had a rather unique system, with nearly every game in the series allowing you to equip your party members with multiple weapons at once, allowing you to quickly switch to a variety of attacks in battle with ease.

Perhaps the most famous feature of the series, however, is the way in which new special attacks are learned. When attacking in battle, a party member will occasionally have a lightbulb appear above their head, and unleash a new attack which, from then on, is permanently acquired. While the likelihood of having this occur is based on the characters' weapon skill level, there is an element of randomness. So, it can be frustrating when a high level character just can't seem to learn the attacks you want. On the other hand, there is nothing quite as cool as getting lucky, and learning a powerful attack early in the game. First introduced in Romancing SaGa 2, the name of this feature has been referred to in future games as both "Sparking" and "Glimmering", and has been used in every SaGa game since.

The series first landed on the shores of the United States with the original installment in 1990. Interestingly enough, however, it was not released here under the SaGa name. Instead, it was renamed after the recently released Final Fantasy. Thus, the trio of SaGa games on the Gameboy is known in America as the "Final Fantasy Legend" trilogy. This has led many people to believe that these three games are merely spinoffs of the popular Final Fantasy franchise, not realizing that they were, in reality, the beginning of an entirely different series. The Romancing SaGa trilogy, released on the Super Famicom in Japan, never saw release in the United States. However, the series returned to the United States with the launch of SaGa Frontier for the Playstation, and every game since has also seen release here. Unfortunately, they have remained decidedly unpopular, consistently scoring poor reviews from professional gaming magazines and websites. Ironically, it is the series' crowning achievement, its open ended gameplay, that is the cause of much of the criticism. Invariably comparing the games to more mainstream titles, reviewers often mistake the lack of linearity for an absence of purpose, inaccurately claiming the games to be devoid of plot. Also a target of criticism is Akitoshi Kawazu's habit of implementing strange, experimental features in his games, a fact that culminated in the highly experimental, but utterly maligned, Unlimited Saga.

Yet, despite its lack of critical acclaim, SaGa has managed to stay just popular enough to stay alive. Although it is not, and most likely never will, become one of Square's mainstream series, it has managed to last for over fifteen years, which is certainly no small feat.

Table of Contents:

Page 1: SaGa 1-3 (Gameboy)
Page 2: Romancing SaGa 1-3 (Super Famicom)
Page 3: SaGa Frontier (Playstation)
Page 4: Unlimited Saga / Romancing SaGa: Minstrel Song (Playstation 2)

Final Fantasy Legend

Final Fantasy Legend II

Romancing SaGa (SFC)

Romancing SaGa 2

Romancing SaGa 3

SaGa Frontier

SaGa Frontier 2

Final Fantasy Legend / Makai Toushi SaGa - Gameboy/Wonderswan Color (1989)


American Cover

Japanese Cover

Final Fantasy Legend

The first game in the series landed on the Gameboy in 1989. It's a fairly typical JRPG, with a completely linear story and a battle system that looks as if it were taken straight out of Dragon Quest. Perhaps the game's most interesting feature is its setting. The story focuses on a massive tower that connects to multiple worlds. The different worlds that connect to the tower range from typical fantasy settings to post-apocalyptic wastelands, creating an interesting contrast. The main bad guys are members of the Chinese constellations - Gen-bu the turtle, Sei-ryu the dragon, Byak-ko the tiger, and Su-zaku the bird. These are all lead by Ashura, the Japanese god of war. The game ends with a battle with the "Creator".

You take the role of an adventurer living in the world that exists at the base of the tower who, along with up to three companions, attempts to take on the tower's challenges and reach the top, venturing through the different worlds in the process. All of the characters in the party are created by the player, and can be chosen among three classes:

Humans
Humans learn no natural abilities. Instead, they can utilize more equipment than the other two races. Up to eight weapons and pieces of armor can be equipped at one time, making them very versatile in attack and defense. However, they can only develop their traits by buying stat raising potions, making it an expensive procedure to increase their battle prowess.
Mutants
Mutants randomly increase their stats at the end of battle. In addition, they can naturally have up to four special abilities. Unfortunately, these are gained and lost at random, and unless the player saves constantly, they may find themselves having their good skills replaced by useless ones.
Monsters
Perhaps the most interesting of the three classes, monsters develop by eating the meat dropped by enemies. Doing this will transform them into different monster forms, with a change in skills and stats. Eating the meat of powerful enemies is the key to creating a strong monster.

Despite its linearity and very basic battle system, it does have certain elements that would eventually develop into the traits that the SaGa series is noted for. Probably the most infamous of these is weapon durability. Unlike most games, where buying a weapon means being able to use it as much as you want, all weapons in ffl come with a certain number of uses. Every time a particular weapon is used in an attack, its durability decreases, and once it reaches zero, the weapon breaks. This system, or a variation of it, would be used in several of the later SaGa games. Equally important is the way in which characters develop. In this game, experience points are not awarded, nor do the characters have levels. Each of the three character classes develops in a different way, and the way in which Mutants develop is a clear precursor to the system that would become the trademark of the series.

Although it seems rather dated by today's standards, its quirks still make it a notable game for the system. If nothing else, it's interesting to see the series in its infancy, when the developers were still experimenting with elements that would eventually become the backbone of the later sequels.

The game was later remade for the Wonderswan Color in 2002. In addition to receiving a substantial graphical facelift, several minor tweaks, taken from the later games, were included that made things a little more convenient. This remake was later ported to cellular phones. Both versions of the remake remained only in Japan.

MP3s Download here

Let It Begin
Main Theme
Burning Blood
Final Battle

Final Fantasy Legend

Final Fantasy Legend

Final Fantasy Legend

Final Fantasy Legend

Final Fantasy Legend

Final Fantasy Legend

Comparison Screenshots - For two shots

Gameboy

Wonderswan

Final Fantasy Legend II / SaGa II: Hihou Densetsu - Gameboy (1990)


American Cover

Japanese Cover

Final Fantasy Legend II

This sequel is very similar to the first game, in both story and gameplay. Once again, the player controls a party of four adventurers who must traverse a tower that connects to other worlds. This time, it is in order to gather Magi, the remnants of an ancient goddess, and stop those who wish to use their power to become new gods. Like the previous game, the party is created by the player, with multiple classes to choose from. The three character races from the first game return, along with the addition with a new class, the robot. Another new addition is the temporary fifth party members that will join you for certain events.

Robots
New to this game, Robots are somewhat odd in the sense that their stats are determined entirely by what equipment they currently have equipped. Additionally, any weapon that they equip will have its durability halved, but they're able to be repaired by sleeping in an inn.

Dad
The main character's father, who is actually the captain of a secret group dedicated to preventing the pieces of Magi from being used. He joins you several times during the game.

Ki
A priestess who was born with the power to heal others. She joins you near the beginning. Later, you must save her life by entering her body to stop monsters that are attacking her from within.

Isis
An ancient goddess with incredible powers. She will be able to assist the party once all of the pieces of Magi have been collected.

Overall, the game is very similar to its predecessor. Weapon durability is still featured, and the battles play almost identically to the original SaGa. However, several areas have been improved which make things much more convenient. When a character gains an increase in stats or learns a new ability, the game will actually inform you at the end of battle. This makes tracking your characters' growth much easier. Additionally, a journal feature has been added, which automatically records important pieces of information for later reference. In short, Final Fantasy Legend II is a refined, and more user friendly, extension of the gameplay established in its prequel. It's also the first game in the series to be composed by Kenji Ito, who would go on to compose the music in nearly all of the following SaGa games.

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Aspiration
The Dreadful Fight

Final Fantasy Legend

Final Fantasy Legend II

Final Fantasy Legend II

Final Fantasy Legend III / SaGa III: Jikku no Hasha - Gameboy (1991)


American Cover

Final Fantasy Legend III

Final Fantasy Legend III

The third title is the only game in the series whose development was not headed by Akitoshi Kawazu, and it shows. Instead, it was made by the team that would later go on to create Final Fantasy Mystic Quest, and there are some very close similarities to that title in both gameplay and overall look. It is, by far, the most generic entry, with many of the unique elements of the first two games being eliminated or greatly dumbed down. The plot, this time around, involves time travel. The future has been devastated by beings from the floating "Pureland". In a last ditch effort to prevent this, three children have been sent back in time to the present day to try to change history. It is the first game to have a set cast of main characters. Like Final Fantasy Legend II, several characters will join your party as a temporary fifth member.

Arthur
A male human, and the main character. He, along with two friends, come from a devastated future. They were sent as children to the past, in the hopes that they could prevent the dismal future from happening.
Curtis
Another one of the children sent from the future, Curtis is a male mutant. Aside from that, he has very little personality or dialogue.
Gloria
A female mutant who was sent back in time with Arthur and Curtis. Like Curtis, she gets relatively little development past that.
Sharon
A human female, and the only one of the four permanent party members that comes from the present day. She was raised alongside them, and thus joins them when they begin their journey. She seems to be especially close to Arthur.
Dion
In the present day, Dion is a snot-nosed brat who lives in the same town as the heroes. Once the party travels to the future, they find that he has grown into a powerful warrior, who joins their party several times.
Faye
Dion's childhood friend, who also becomes a skilled fighter in the future. She is the only one who can claim the legendary sword Excalibur, and joins the party in order to find it.
Borgin
The man responsible for sending the children into the past. He is skilled in both weapons and magic, and joins the party near the end of the game.

In many ways, Final Fantasy Legend III is a vast departure from the rest of the series. Gone is the weapon durability featured in the first two games. In addition, it is the only SaGa game to feature a normal level-based growth system, with experience points being awarded for defeating enemies. These two factors make it one of the easiest games in the series. The music was composed by Ryuji Sasai, who later went on to compose Final Fantasy Mystic Quest and Tresure of the Rudras for Square. There are a few decent songs, but overall, the soundtrack is weaker than the previous and future games in the series.

Although none of the characters start off as the Monster or Robot classes from the previous games, any of the four main characters can become one. When enemies are defeated, they can drop meat or robot parts, and eating or installing them will change a character into an intermediate form, Beast and Cyborg, and an additional one will transform them into full Monsters or Robots. Consuming the opposite type will revert them into their default classes. The fact that any of the characters can change their class at any time does allow a greater degree of customization, but it also significantly reduces the challenge.

There are several other changes made in this game, though not all of them are bad. It's the first in the series that will automatically target the next available enemy if the enemy initially targeted is already defeated. Additionally, the characters are now shown on the screen along with the enemies. Though it ultimately does nothing to change the Dragon Quest style battles, it's still a nice touch. The ability to jump while in dungeons is yet another addition, though this is largely just a novelty outside of a few puzzles that require its use. In the end, though, Final Fantasy Legend III is the weakest of the Gameboy trio. Just as the team made a dumbed down Final Fantasy game in Mystic Quest, their attempt at a SaGa wound up being generic and largely uninteresting.

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Title Theme
Battle
Dungeon

Final Fantasy Legend III

Final Fantasy Legend III

Final Fantasy Legend III

Final Fantasy Legend III

Final Fantasy Legend III

Final Fantasy Legend III

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