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Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers
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Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers (チップとデールの大作戦) - NES, Arcade (1990)

American NES Cover

Another cult favorite among those who grew up in the NES age, Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers is another basic platformer based on the cartoon of the same name. The plot for Rescue Rangers is simple. Fat Cat, the main antagonist from the cartoon, has kidnapped the Rescue Ranger Gadget. It's up to Chip and Dale to save her and administer a severe beating to rotund feline. Monterey Jack, the big Australian mouse, makes a quick and useless cameo to open up a few doors, and Zipper the fly acts as an invincibility power-up.

The best aspect is the two player simultaneous play. It's a ton of fun to play through each level, picking up boxes and chucking them at enemies. You can even be a jerk, pick up your friend and toss them at obstacles. It's also a very fast paced game, which adds to the fun. Collecting ubiquitous flower and star icons will make precious 1-ups appear, while you can stack crates to overcome various obstacles. After the first level, you're taken to a map screen where you can choose the next level. What's nice about this is it's possible to completely bypass certain levels if you don't feel like playing them or if you're having trouble with one. It's not a breakthrough in gaming, but the freedom granted is nice.

A particularly charming aspect of Rescue Rangers is the size difference between Chip and Dale and the rest of the level. Throughout the game you'll scramble alongside giant fences, leap across fan-blades, scale countertops and bookshelves, all the while fighting miniature robot mutts and rats. Even simple objects such as running faucets prove to be a trial for Chip and Dale. Apples, practically twice the size of Chip and Dale, can also be chucked at enemies. Carrying these apples causes the characters to sweat constantly, and weigh the little chipmunks down, making jumping difficult. While these are minor details, it shows how much effort the developers put into the game. The bright, colorful graphics, upbeat music, and interesting level design add to the overall experience.

While each level is well-made and challenging, the boss fights at the end fall flat. Each boss fight is a giant sprite that fires a barrage of projectiles at you. All that's required to defeat each boss is to throw a ball upward into their faces and avoid getting hit. The only difference between each fight is the appearance of the boss and the number of projectiles. This is particularly disappointing, considering even the final boss falls into same pattern. It's a fun game overall though, especially in multiplayer, even though it's a bit on the easy side.

Quick Info:

Developer:

Capcom

Publisher:

Capcom

Genre:

Platforming

Themes:

Licensed
Microcosmic


Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers (NES)

Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers (NES)

Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers (NES)


View all "Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers" items on eBay


Additional Screenshots


Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers 2 (チップとデールの大作戦2) - NES (1994)

American NES Cover

Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers 2 was the final NES Disney game released by Capcom, in 1994. Considering how long the SNES had been available, it's strange that the sequel to the original Chip 'n Dale didn't make the jump into the next gaming generation.

Fat Cat has escaped from jail and has stolen the Urn of the Pharaoh in the process. Not keen on the idea of allowing Fat Cat to roam free, Chip and Dale take it upon themselves to reclaim the urn and return the portly cat to jail.

First and foremost, Rescue Rangers 2 is more of the same. The areas Chip and Dale explore are larger compared to themselves, the platforming elements are still strong, and the level design is enjoyable once again. The graphical palette, on the other hand, is muddy in the early levels and very unattractive. The later levels do brighten up and reclaim the old charm that the original game had, but it's a poor first impression.

The biggest improvement Rescue Rangers 2 enjoys is the boss battles. The fights have graduated from the ball chucking formula of the first game and have added upgraded boss attack patterns and battlefield hazards. The first boss fight, for example, is against a water-shooting rat that constantly leaps from platform to platform while attacking you. The platforms are flooded by water which gradually drags you down to a chasm at the bottom of the stage. It's challenging and is a welcome change from the mind-numbing fights of the original.

The bosses are the only things that have been improved upon, which is the main problem with Rescue Rangers 2. If you've played the first, you already know what to expect from this installment. It would have been nice to see new items, branching paths, or multiple endings. Instead, the map screen was completely eliminated, and the game made much more linear. It's another example of wasted potential that Capcom could have taken advantage of.

Quick Info:

Developer:

Capcom

Publisher:

Capcom

Genre:

Platforming

Themes:

Licensed
Microcosmic


Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers 2 (NES)

Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers 2 (NES)

Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers 2 (NES)


View all "Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers 2" items on eBay


Additional Screenshots


Other Versions: Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers: The Adventure in Nimnul's Castle - DOS (1990)

American DOS Cover

Published by Hi-Tech Expressions (mostly known for edutainment, crap, and crappy edutainment) and developed by Riedel Software Productions, Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers: The Adventures in Nimnul's Castle, is the only non-Capcom game based on the TV series. It presents itself as a fairly straightforward series of challenges. In the first scene, you need to infiltrate the mad scientist's fortress by climbing in and out of holes, ducking in to avoid the patrol dog and watching out for the goo tossed from the top of the screen. In the second scene, you play as Chip walking on a set of steps, as you pick up screws and hand them down to Dale. (Apparently, Gadget the mouse inventor needs these to fix their plane and save Monterey Jack.) In the third scene, you face off against one of Nimnul's inventions (also one of the bosses in the first NES game), as you climb on a rope and once again drop bolts down to Dale. Each of these scenes has three levels, and then the game is over. The action is slow and choppy, making it hard to dodge some of the random obstacles. Very poor overall. It has some amusingly poor-looking cutscenes though.

Quick Info:

Developer:

Ridel Software Productions

Publisher:

Walt Disney Computer Sotware
Hi-Tech Expressions

Genre:

Adventure: Other
Platforming

Themes:

Licensed


The Adventure in Nimnul's Castle (DOS)


Additional Screenshots


TaleSpin - NES, Game Boy (1991)

European NES Cover

By this point, Capcom has stretched itself thin. TaleSpin is technically the fourth Disney game release, and the developer's exhaustion has become evident. As a delivery man, Baloo the bear (originally from The Jungle Book) delivers a variety of cargo to the people of the cape. It's not an easy job, as Don Karnage and his pirates attempt to shoot Baloo out of the sky at every turn and steal his goods.

TaleSpin is an anomaly when compared to the rest of the Disney releases. Rather than a platformer or a sidescroller, TaleSpin is a horizontal shoot em up. Unlike most shooters, there's also a health gauge that can be replenished throughout the level, and colliding with objects causes absolutely no damage. On top of that, it's possible to flip Baloo's plane upside down and fly backwards. This also causes the scrolling of the stage to come to a halt and reverse direction. Though odd, it makes collecting power ups and bonus items much easier. It's also extremely important during boss fights, as a few of them will try to attack you from behind. Hot dogging it while fighting bosses is actually pretty fun, even if it is a bit confusing at times.

Cash is awarded at the completion of each stage, and can be used to buy upgrades for Baloo's plane before the next stage. Speed upgrades, extra lives, and additional firepower can be purchased from the shop-often at very high prices. In some cases the shop makes life easier, since the upgrades are permanent and it's not necessary to grapple with enemies over them like most other shooters would have you do. At the same time, many of these upgrades should have been granted at the start. Baloo can only fire a single shot initially, and must wait before the bullet disappears before he can fire another. There are upgrades that enable you to fire two, three, or as many as you can possibly fire at once. Being forced to buy rate of fire upgrades is ridiculous, especially since the amount of bullets you can fire strongly affects the difficulty of the game. It's clear that this decision was made to make the game harder, thereby increasing the game's playtime.

TaleSpin hits the wall in the presentation department. The sprites are small and dull-looking, the stages have very little detail, and the sound effects are little more than a bunch of blips and screeches. The music isn't particularly interesting, but at the very least isn't annoying. Capcom had an excellent chance to make impressive stages with the backtracking ability Baloo has, but completely ignored it. There's very little variety in each stage and each one plays like the last.

TaleSpin is yet another victim of lazy, rushed design. It's not the worst game ever produced for the NES, but there's little reason to play it outside of nostalgia. Capcom is responsible for a large number of highly respected shoot 'em ups, and if enough time was spent with TaleSpin it may have become one of the greats.

The Game Boy game is a near-perfect port of the original. The size of the stages has been condensed somewhat, though the actual layout is nearly the same. Like the other ports, there is a loss of background detail such as the flashes of lightning in one stage. The screen is also zoomed in, resulting in larger sprites than on the NES. Oddly enough, the graphics look a bit better than the NES version. For better or worse, it's the exact same game. Today, however, there's no real reason to play the Game Boy port over the original.

Quick Info:

Developer:

Capcom

Publisher:

Capcom

Genre:

Shoot-'em-Up: Other

Themes:

Licensed


TaleSpin (NES)

TaleSpin (NES)

TaleSpin (Game Boy)


Additional Screenshots


Other Versions: TaleSpin - TurboGrafx-16 (1991), Genesis, Game Gear (1992)

TaleSpin also saw released on the TurboGrafx-16, courtesy of TTI, and on the Genesis and Game Gear, courtesy of Sega. They're typical side scrolling platformers, although the NEC and Sega versions are completely different games.

In the Genesis game, you need to explore a small area to find all of the missing cargo boxes. You can choose to play as either Baloo, who uses a ball paddle to attack, or Kit, who uses a slingshot. You can also play in two player simultaneous mode. The action's a bit sloppy, but at least you can take several hits before dying. It's actually not too bad, as far as sidescrollers go, even though there's nothing terrible special about it. A Game Gear version was also released, and is very similar, although the action is far choppier.

TaleSpin (Genesis)


The TurboGrafx-16 version, published by TTI, is a more straightforward platformer, where the goal is simply to get to the end. You play as Baloo, who attacks by tossing coconuts. Unfortunately, they're extremely weak and hard to aim. The enemy placement is aggravating, and the whole effort is fairly amateurish. The graphics are cleaner, but lack detail compared to the Genesis game. It's not as terrible as the Darkwing Duck game for the TG-16, but it's still quite subpar.

TaleSpin (TurboGrafx-16)


<<< Prior Page

Next Page >>>

Page 1:
Mickey Mousecapade

Page 2:
DuckTales
DuckTales 2

Page 3:
Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers
Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers 2
TaleSpin

Page 4:
The Little Mermaid
Darkwing Duck
Adventures in the Magic Kingdom

Back to the Index